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About 255 results

ALLMedicine™ Bruxism Center

Research & Reviews  99 results

Lower serotonin levels in severe sleep bruxism and its association with sleep, heart ra...
https://doi.org/10.1111/joor.13295
Journal of Oral Rehabilitation; Smardz J, Martynowicz H et. al.

Dec 16th, 2021 - Sleep bruxism (SB) is a complex behavior that seems to be associated with serotoninergic pathway. This exploratory research aimed to evaluate the levels of serotonin in individuals with sleep bruxism diagnosed by video polysomnography. The study a...

Polysomnographic characteristics of sleep-related bruxism: What are the determinant fac...
https://doi.org/10.1080/08869634.2021.2014167
Cranio : the Journal of Craniomandibular Practice; Ahci S, Bal B et. al.

Dec 11th, 2021 - This study aimed to evaluate the clinical and polysomnographic characteristics of sleep bruxism (SB) and delineate the determinant factors for temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Forty-six patients were allocated into the SB group (n = 26) and cont...

Associations between sleep bruxism and other sleep-related disorders in adults: a syste...
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2021.11.008
Sleep Medicine; Kuang B, Li D et. al.

Dec 9th, 2021 - Systematic reviews on sleep bruxism (SB) as a comorbid condition of other sleep-related disorders are lacking. Such reviews would contribute to the insight of sleep clinicians into the occurrence of SB in patients with other sleep-related disorder...

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News  2 results

Nail Biting: A Habit or a Disease?
https://www.staging.medscape.com/viewarticle/863395

May 19th, 2016 - An Oral Parafunctional Habit Nail biting (onychophagia) is an oral parafunctional habit—the use of the mouth for a purpose other than speaking, eating, or drinking, a category that includes bruxism (grinding teeth), digit sucking, pencil chewing, ...

Nail Biting: A Habit or a Disease?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/863395

May 19th, 2016 - An Oral Parafunctional Habit Nail biting (onychophagia) is an oral parafunctional habit—the use of the mouth for a purpose other than speaking, eating, or drinking, a category that includes bruxism (grinding teeth), digit sucking, pencil chewing, ...

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Patient Education  1 results see all →