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ALLMedicine™ Irritant Contact Dermatitis Center

Research & Reviews  151 results

What You Need to Know About Hand Hygiene and Dermatitis During the Coronavirus Pandemic.
https://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2021.05.200648
Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM; Nguyen AS, Thielen BV et. al.

Sep 19th, 2021 - Increased attention towards infection control measures during the COVID-19 pandemic have brought to light the dermatological consequences of intensified hand hygiene measures. Healthcare workers are inherently at an increased risk of developing bo...

The History of Surfactants and Review of Their Allergic and Irritant Properties.
https://doi.org/10.1097/DER.0000000000000730
Dermatitis : Contact, Atopic, Occupational, Drug; Presley CL, Militello M et. al.

Sep 16th, 2021 - Surfactants, many of which are used as detergents, can be found in many common household items, such as shampoos, conditioners, soaps, and cosmetics. One should recognize the multitude of surfactants that are used in today's products to identify a...

Effectiveness of Semiocclusive Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose Fibers and Hydrocolloid D...
https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ASW.0000767336.91651.67
Advances in Skin & Wound Care; Collado-Boira E, Boldo-Roda P et. al.

Aug 21st, 2021 - The most common complication in individuals with ostomies is irritant contact dermatitis from the acidic stoma effluent coming into contact with the peristomal skin. Although protective powders are widely used for the treatment of peristomal skin,...

Painful scrotal dermatitis secondary to topical 5-fluorouracil.
https://doi.org/10.5070/D327654060
Dermatology Online Journal; Yi JZ, Himes RS et. al.

Aug 14th, 2021 - 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is an antineoplastic agent that is used topically to treat actinic keratoses. Although topical 5-FU frequently causes irritant contact dermatitis at the site of application, distant skin reactions are rare and could relate to...

Contact Dermatitis: Classifications and Management.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12016-021-08875-0
Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology; Li Y, Li L

Jul 16th, 2021 - Contact dermatitis (CD) is a common inflammatory skin disease caused by exposure to contact allergens and irritants. It is also the most common reason of occupational dermatitis and contributes greatly to hand dermatitis and facial dermatitis. Bes...

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Drugs  1 results see all →

News  26 results

Gene Expression Different in Allergic, Irritant Contact Dermatitis
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/943481

Jan 4th, 2021 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Artificial intelligence (AI) can help identify biomarkers to distinguish between contact dermatitis (CD) due to allergic reactions or to irritants, according to new findings. There were major differences in gene express...

Improvements in Chronic Hand Eczema Seen With Oral Gusacitinib in Phase 2 Study
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/941412

Nov 23rd, 2020 - Gusacitinib, a novel oral inhibitor of multiple inflammatory pathways, achieved rapid and clinically meaningful improvement in corticosteroid-refractory moderate to severe chronic hand eczema in a phase 2b, randomized trial, Howard Sofen, MD, repo...

Fast Five Quiz: Dermatitis
https://reference.medscape.com/viewarticle/940181_1

Nov 4th, 2020 - Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin condition that typically affects the face (cheeks), neck, arms, and legs but usually spares the groin and axillary regions. Although dermatitis improves in most patients, the condition can...

Fast Five Quiz: Dermatitis
https://reference.medscape.com/viewarticle/940181

Nov 4th, 2020 - Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin condition that typically affects the face (cheeks), neck, arms, and legs but usually spares the groin and axillary regions. Although dermatitis improves in most patients, the condition can...

Recurring rash on neck and axilla
https://www.mdedge.com/familymedicine/article/211555/dermatology/recurring-rash-neck-and-axilla?channel=114
MDedge Family Medicine;

Nov 7th, 2019 - The FP initially treated the area with topical ketoconazole cream, which stung, but partially improved the patient’s symptoms. Because the rash persisted, the FP performed a punch biopsy, which showed widespread epidermal acantholysis or separatio.

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