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About 1,020 results

ALLMedicine™ Myiasis Center

Research & Reviews  509 results

Lysenko and the Screwworm Fly-When Politics Interferes with Science and Public Health.
https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186687
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health; Brisola Marcondes C, Canale A et. al.

Sep 17th, 2020 - In the One Health scenario, a deep understanding of the dynamics potentially threatening the development and implementation of useful pest and vector management tools is of key importance. The New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coqu...

A Rare Case of Tracheostomal Myiasis in a Child.
https://doi.org/10.1177/0145561320958977
Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal; Bettadahalli V, Singh GB et. al.

Sep 14th, 2020 - A Rare Case of Tracheostomal Myiasis in a Child.|2020|Bettadahalli V,Singh GB,Kumar S,Mirdha BR,|

New safe haven for maggots: a report of penile wound myiasis.
https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-237762
BMJ Case Reports; Talwar HS, Panwar VK

Sep 9th, 2020 - New safe haven for maggots: a report of penile wound myiasis.|2020|Talwar HS,Panwar VK,|

Grub in the mouth: an unusual case with review of literature.
https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-234818
BMJ Case Reports; Astekar M, Gujjar SV et. al.

Sep 8th, 2020 - Oral myiasis is a rare disease, identified primarily in non-industrialised nations. It is caused fundamentally by the attack of larvae from Dipteran flies on the human tissues. Predisposing factors for oral myiasis are extraction wounds, destitute...

The Botfly, A Tropical Menace: A Distinctive Myiasis Caused by Dermatobia hominis.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s40257-020-00522-2
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology; Ragi SD, Kapila R et. al.

Aug 16th, 2020 - Dermatobia hominis, also known as the human botfly, is native to tropical and subtropical Central and South America and seen in travelers from endemic to temperate regions including the United States and Europe. Cutaneous infestation botfly myiasi...

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Clinicaltrials.gov  509 results

Lysenko and the Screwworm Fly-When Politics Interferes with Science and Public Health.
https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186687
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health; Brisola Marcondes C, Canale A et. al.

Sep 17th, 2020 - In the One Health scenario, a deep understanding of the dynamics potentially threatening the development and implementation of useful pest and vector management tools is of key importance. The New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coqu...

A Rare Case of Tracheostomal Myiasis in a Child.
https://doi.org/10.1177/0145561320958977
Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal; Bettadahalli V, Singh GB et. al.

Sep 14th, 2020 - A Rare Case of Tracheostomal Myiasis in a Child.|2020|Bettadahalli V,Singh GB,Kumar S,Mirdha BR,|

New safe haven for maggots: a report of penile wound myiasis.
https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-237762
BMJ Case Reports; Talwar HS, Panwar VK

Sep 9th, 2020 - New safe haven for maggots: a report of penile wound myiasis.|2020|Talwar HS,Panwar VK,|

Grub in the mouth: an unusual case with review of literature.
https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-234818
BMJ Case Reports; Astekar M, Gujjar SV et. al.

Sep 8th, 2020 - Oral myiasis is a rare disease, identified primarily in non-industrialised nations. It is caused fundamentally by the attack of larvae from Dipteran flies on the human tissues. Predisposing factors for oral myiasis are extraction wounds, destitute...

The Botfly, A Tropical Menace: A Distinctive Myiasis Caused by Dermatobia hominis.
https://doi.org/10.1007/s40257-020-00522-2
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology; Ragi SD, Kapila R et. al.

Aug 16th, 2020 - Dermatobia hominis, also known as the human botfly, is native to tropical and subtropical Central and South America and seen in travelers from endemic to temperate regions including the United States and Europe. Cutaneous infestation botfly myiasi...

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News  2 results

Furuncular Myiasis in 2 American Travelers Returning From Senegal
https://www.mdedge.com/dermatology/article/89270/wounds/furuncular-myiasis-2-american-travelers-returning-senegal/page/0/2

Dec 9th, 2014 - Conclusion We present 2 cases of travelers returning to North America from Senegal with C anthropophaga furuncular myiasis. Careful review of travel history, physical examination, and identification of fly larvae are important for diagnosis.

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