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Transport Media Safety Risk - Use Compatible Transport Media with SARS-CoV-2 Tests that Use Bleach - Letter to Clinical Laboratory Staff and Health Care Providers | FDA
https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/letters-health-care-providers/transport-media-safety-risk-use-compatible-transport-media-sars-cov-2-tests-use-bleach-letter

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reminds laboratory staff to use transport media (the liquid that maintains a specimen sample while it is transported to a laboratory) that are compatible with the SARS-CoV-2 testing platforms and the processes used in their laboratory to process samples collected from people who are being tested for SARS-CoV-2. There is a risk of exposure to harmful c...

Study Highlights Risk Factors of Genital Infections with SGLT2i
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931704

Jun 3rd, 2020 - Takeaway Prior history of genital infection and gender are key predictors of genital infection with sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i). The risk of genital infection increased with higher glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in patients using dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP4i), but not SGLT2i. Early genital infection was associated with treatment discontinuation risk. Why this ma...

Hidradenitis Suppurativa Tied to Increased Cancer Risk
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931544

Jun 3rd, 2020 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) was associated with an increased risk of cancer in a population-based study in Korea. Dr. Mi Woo Lee of the University of Ulsan College of Medicine in Seoul investigated overall and specific cancer incidence rates in more than 22,000 HS patients and close to 180,000 matched controls. The mean age was 34 and 64% in both groups were male. ...

The Gut a New Therapeutic Target for Brain Disorders?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931719

Jun 3rd, 2020 - Changes in the mucus that lines the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may contribute to bacterial imbalance in the gut and exacerbate core symptoms of autism, Parkinson disease (PD), Alzheimer disease (AD), and multiple sclerosis (MS), new research suggests. Dr Elisa Hill-Yardin "Our research highlights the importance of addressing gut problems that can be experienced by people with brain disorders, ...

Should Healthcare Workers Wear Masks at Home?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931706

Jun 3rd, 2020 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. Wearing a mask at home, even when everyone is feeling fine, might reduce the risk of frontline healthcare workers transmitting SARS-CoV-2 infection to their families, a recent study from China suggests. But the benefits might not outweigh the costs, according to several physicians interviewed. "...

A Bumpy Virtual #ASCO20; Returning to Chicago in 2021?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931723

Jun 3rd, 2020 - CYBERSPACE — Hope Rugo, MD, was one of the would-be attendees of the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting who could not access the online event on its first day last Friday, May 29. "Such a shame – virtual ASCO is non existent," tweeted Rugo, who is from the University of California, San Francisco. The breast cancer specialist tried for more than hour before finally gaining entr...

'Global Epicenter' of Problematic Cholesterol Has Shifted
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931676

Jun 3rd, 2020 - (Reuters Health) - High cholesterol is on the rise in low- and middle-income countries while declining in wealthier ones, an international team of researchers finds in a new analysis. Based on more than 1,000 population-based studies that measured blood lipids in over 100 million adults from around the world, the results show that between 1980 and 2018, prevalence of high non-HDL cholesterol ha...

TNF Overcomes Medulloblastoma Immune Evasion
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931456

Jun 3rd, 2020 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) restores expression of surface class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I) in p53-mutant medulloblastoma, thereby overcoming its evasion of the immune system, researchers report. "p53 is a tumor-suppressor gene that is mutated in half of all human cancers, and it has been widely studied as a regulator of cell proliferation, cell death...

Increased Risk for Invasive Breast Cancer After DCIS
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931733

Jun 3rd, 2020 - One of the controversies of routine mammography screening of healthy women is that it detects minimal-risk breast cancer, including the vast majority of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which has led to concerns of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. This in turn has led to proposals that DCIS could be managed by active surveillance instead of immediate treatment with surgery. But a new analysis...

Congenital Syphilis Cases Skyrocket, CDC Says
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931749

Jun 3rd, 2020 - The number of reported cases of congenital syphilis has risen almost fourfold since 2013 — a result of multiple missed opportunities for prevention during pregnancy, researchers say. From 2013 to 2018, reported cases of congenital syphilis increased from 362 to 1306, with 94 stillbirths or early infant deaths occurring during 2018 alone. "This is the most we have had in the United States since ...

The Latest Update on COVID-19 and the Heart
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931657

Jun 3rd, 2020 - Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. People having heart attacks, strokes, or symptoms of other heart problems are avoiding hospitals because they are scared of contracting COVID-19. COVID-19 not only can worsen current cardiovascular disease but also can cause new heart issues. COVID-19 appears to affect the heart and blood vessels by causing in...

No Role for Adjv Atezolizumab in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931730

Jun 3rd, 2020 - "There is currently no role for adjuvant atezolizumab [Tecentriq, Genentech] in muscle-invasive bladder cancer," according to Daniel Y. C. Heng, MD, MPH, who was commenting on negative results from a phase 3 clinical trial. "So why is there a benefit in the metastatic setting but not in this adjuvant setting?" he asked. "Why is there a benefit potentially or efficacy shown in the non–muscle-inv...

D-Cycloserine for Social Anxiety: Does Timing Matter?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931743

Jun 3rd, 2020 - D-cycloserine (DCS), an antibiotic that has traditionally been used to treat tuberculosis, appears to augment exposure therapy (ET) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) regardless of whether it's administered before or after a session, new research suggests. Results of the double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial show that treatment with the partial agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (N...

Secondary Surgery Extends OS in Recurrent Ovarian Cancer
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931732

Jun 3rd, 2020 - In a phase 3 trial, combining cytoreductive surgery with chemotherapy significantly prolonged progression-free and overall survival among select patients with recurrent ovarian cancer who had a platinum-free interval of more than 6 months. The trial, AGO DESKTOP III/ENGOT ov20, is the first prospective, randomized study showing an overall survival benefit for debulking surgery in patients with ...

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Eases Persistent Postconcussion Symptoms
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931773

Jun 3rd, 2020 - Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) markedly reduces multiple symptoms of persistent postconcussion syndrome (PPCS) following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), results from a randomized controlled crossover study show. In civilians and military veterans with mTBI/PPCS, HBOT led to significant improvement in postconcussion symptoms, memory/cognition, behavioral/emotional problems, and sleep, resu...

Two Journals Retract Studies on HCQ, Heart Disease in COVID-19
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931774

Jun 3rd, 2020 - The Lancet announced today that it has retracted a highly cited study that suggested hydroxychloroquine may cause more harm than benefit in patients with COVID-19. Hours later, the New England Journal of Medicine announced that it had retracted a second article by some of the same authors, also on heart disease and COVID-19. The Lancet article, titled "Hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine with or ...

Herpes Zoster Infection With MS Treatment Higher in Women?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931755

Jun 3rd, 2020 - Reports of herpes zoster virus (HZV) among patients being treated with disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis (MS) are nearly 5 times higher among women vs men and commonly occur in people under the age of 40, a new study of adverse event reports on a variety of DMTs suggests. DMTs are known to be associated with a potentially increased risk of opportunistic infections, inclu...

Wildlife Groups Up Pressure on Big Pharma to Curb Crab Blood Addiction
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931520

Jun 3rd, 2020 - ZURICH (Reuters) - Wildlife advocates are pushing drugmakers to curb the use of horseshoe crab blood by switching to a synthetic alternative for safety tests, including those needed before a COVID-19 vaccine can be used on humans. Fishermen net hundreds of thousands of the creatures off the U.S. East Coast and Asia every year, draining their prized milky-blue blood for use in medical safety tes...

High Serum Levels of 'Forever Chemicals' Tied to Earlier Menopause
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931709

Jun 3rd, 2020 - In a national sample of US women in their mid-40s to mid-50s, those with high serum levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were likely to enter menopause 2 years earlier than those with low levels of these chemicals. That is, the median age of natural menopause was 52.8 years versus 50.8 years in women with high versus low serum levels of these chemicals in an analysis of data fro...

American Indians, Alaska Natives Less Likely to Get Optimal Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/931519

Jun 3rd, 2020 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - American Indians and Alaska natives (AI/ANs) with atrial fibrillation (AF) are less likely to be treated with oral anticoagulants (OACs) and rhythm control strategies than other ethnic groups, according to a large U.S. registry study. "Overall, our findings add to the concerning evidence of reduced rates of OAC therapy and rhythm control therapies among patients of c...