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About 100 results
U.S. Gout Rates Remain Steady, but Substantial
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/77452

Jan 16th, 2019 - Action Points The prevalence of gout and hyperuricemia among U.S. adults was stable at 3.9% (9.2 million adults) but remained substantial over the past decade. Understand that only a minority of gout patients are receiving urate-lowering therapy, and that the current stability of gout and hyperuricemia may be related to plateauing trends of chronic kidney disease and hypertension in the U.S. ov...

High Urate Does Predict Gout Risk
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/74886

Aug 31st, 2018 - Action Points Asymptomatic men and women were at increased risk for clinically diagnosed gout during almost 30 years of follow-up when their baseline serum urate level was elevated, according to a Swedish disease risk factor database. Realize that asymptomatic hyperuricemia is common, with an estimated prevalence of 10% to 20% in Western populations, but only 10% to 20% of individuals with hype...

Correcting for Protein in Parenteral Nutrition Does Not Affect Hyponatremia Risk
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/890009

Dec 13th, 2017 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Most patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) have hyponatremia, and PN composition does not appear to affect hyponatremia risk, according to a new study. Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder among inpatients, and is linked to increased mortality, Dr. Emilia Gomez-Hoyos of Universidad de Valladolid in Spain and colleagues note in their report, onl...

Elusive Diagnosis of Acute Intermittent Porphyria in a Teenage Girl
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/889629

Dec 5th, 2017 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Abdominal pain and hyponatremia in a 16-year-old girl with constipation and disordered eating confounded the diagnosis of a much less common condition, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), according to a case report published online December 5 in Pediatrics. Dr. Terrell Stevenson and colleagues from Stanford University School of Medicine, in California, describe a pre...

Study: New View on Thyroidectomy and Hospital Performance
https://www.medpagetoday.com/endocrinology/thyroid/69540

Nov 29th, 2017 - Action Points Certain thyroidectomy-specific outcomes may be helpful as national hospital quality improvements metrics. Note that 30-day hypocalcemia and recurrent laryngeal nerve injury rates were lower among the best performing hospitals participating in the ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). Certain thyroidectomy-specific outcomes may be helpful as national hospit...

FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA requires drug interaction studies with potassium-lowering drug Kayexalate (sodium polystyrene sulfonate)
https://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm468035.htm

[ 10-22-2015 ] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring the Kayexalate manufacturer to conduct studies to investigate Kayexalate’s potential to bind to other medications administered by mouth – drug interactions that could affect how well the other medications work. Kayexalate (sodium polystyrene sulfonate) and generic brands Kionex and SPS are used to treat hyperkalemia, a seri...

High Serum Urate Predicts Poor Physical Performance
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/60915

Oct 20th, 2016 - Action Points Note that this observational study found associations between higher uric acid levels and poor physical performance in elderly individuals. Be aware that the researchers did not account for the presence of gouty disease, a potential mediator of the observed relationship. Hyperuricemia, a condition that becomes more common as serum uric acid (SUA) levels rise with age, appears to c...

Bariatric Surgery Helps Forestall Gout
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/60740

Oct 12th, 2016 - Action Points Obese individuals who underwent bariatric surgery had a 34% decreased likelihood of subsequently developing gout. Note that the study results suggest that the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery are not limited to weight loss but also extend to the prevention of hyperuricemia and gout. Obese individuals who underwent bariatric surgery had a 34% decreased likelihood of subseque...

Big Toe Often Takes Hit in Gout
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/60576

Oct 4th, 2016 - Action Points Ultrasound features of urate deposition, soft tissue inflammation, and bone erosion were common at the first metatarsophalangeal joint (1MTPJ) in people with gout, despite the absence of clinical symptoms of acute arthritis. Note that individuals with asymptomatic hyperuricemia demonstrated a similar frequency of urate deposition, but did not demonstrate features of inflammation o...

DASH Diet: A Role in Gout?
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/59683

Aug 15th, 2016 - Action Points Note that this post-hoc analysis of a randomized trial suggested a DASH-style diet might lower serum urate levels. Interestingly, higher sodium intake was also associated with lower serum urate levels. People with hyperuricemia who followed the blood-pressure-lowering DASH diet showed significant decreases in serum urate levels, post-hoc analysis of data from an influential random...

Gout: Is Prenatal Disaster Exposure a Risk Factor?
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/59461

Aug 2nd, 2016 - Action Points Fetal exposure to a natural disaster such as an earthquake -- representing severe in utero stress -- was associated with a 70% increased likelihood of developing hyperuricemia in adulthood. Note that the fetal programming hypothesis argues that stress during in utero development can predispose people to multiple diseases such as hypertension and chronic kidney disease in later lif...

Fast Five Quiz: What Do You Know About the Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/864056

Jun 2nd, 2016 - The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the most common cause of euvolemic hyponatremia in hospitalized patients. The prognosis of SIADH correlates with the underlying cause and the effects of severe hyponatremia and its overzealous correction. Rapid and complete recovery tends to be the rule with drug-induced SIADH when the offending agent is withdrawn. Successf...

Fast Five Quiz: What Do You Know About Hyponatremia?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/862000

Apr 18th, 2016 - Hyponatremia is an important and common electrolyte abnormality that can be seen in isolation or, as most often is the case, as a complication of other medical illnesses. It is defined as a serum sodium level <135 mEq/L and is considered severe when the serum level is <125 mEq/L. Many medical illnesses, such as congestive heart failure, liver failure, renal failure, and pneumonia, may be associ...

Febuxostat for Gout With Renal Failure Appears Feasible
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/56444

Feb 26th, 2016 - Action Points Patients with gout with moderate-to-severe renal impairment treated with febuxostat (Uloric) achieved their target serum urate levels (<6 mg/dL) without worsening of renal function, in a 95-patient, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept trial. Note that > 70% of patients with gout have impairments in kidney function, and the use of urate-lowering therapies, like allopurinol, can be...

Acetazolamide Fails to Reduce COPD Ventilation Time
https://www.medpagetoday.com/pulmonology/smokingcopd/55963

Feb 2nd, 2016 - Action Points Treatment with acetazolamide (Diamox) did not significantly reduce invasive mechanical ventilation times among hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and metabolic alkalosis, but the drug may still benefit these critically ill patients. Note that the findings indicated that the inhibition of the renal carbonic anhydrase enzyme and the resulting serum bica...

Could Coffee Cut the Risk of Gout?
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/55907

Jan 29th, 2016 - Action Points Regular coffee consumption was associated with a decreased risk of gout. Note that the study suggests that people with hyperuricemia and gout should consider consuming coffee. Regular coffee consumption was associated with a decreased risk of gout, a meta-analysis conducted by Korean researchers found, although the magnitude of the effect (if it is an effect) was relatively small....

Gout Crystals Linked With Cardiac Calcium
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/arthritis/55803

Jan 22nd, 2016 - Action Points Coronary calcification is more severe in the presence of ultrasound-detected monosodium urate crystal deposits in patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Note that it is still unknown whether asymptomatic hyperuricemia is a causal factor of cardiovascular disease. Coronary calcification is more severe in the presence of ultrasound-detected monosodium urate crystal deposits in pa...

Do Urate Crystals Matter in Gout CV Risk?
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/54460

Nov 2nd, 2015 - Action Points The presence of monosodium urate crystal precipitation does not appear to further worsen the elevated cardiovascular risk among patients with hyperuricemia. Note that there also were no increased risks for patients with crystal deposition when analyzed according to age, sex, previous cardiovascular events, or the presence of chronic kidney disease, hypertension, or diabetes. The p...

Visceral and Liver Fat Linked With Men's High Urate
https://www.medpagetoday.com/rheumatology/generalrheumatology/53944

Oct 6th, 2015 - Action Points Note that this observational study of Japanese men found a strong association between intra-abdominal fat and hyperuricemia. Be aware that the study design does not allow for assessment of causality. Both visceral and liver fat accumulation significantly increased the risk of hyperuricemia in men, a cross-sectional Japanese study found. Compared with the lowest quintile of intra-a...

Fast Five Quiz: Can You Identify and Treat Hyperkalemia?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/849260

Aug 11th, 2015 - Owing to a lack of distinctive signs and symptoms, hyperkalemia can be difficult to diagnose. In fact, it is frequently discovered as an incidental laboratory finding. The physician must be quick to consider hyperkalemia in patients who are at risk for this disease process. Do you know who is at risk and best practices for this condition? Test your knowledge with this short quiz.