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About 338 results

ALLMedicine™ Allergy Immunotherapy Center

Research & Reviews  112 results

Subcutaneous immunotherapy takes more than the time in the clinic.
https://doi.org/10.1080/03007995.2021.1976126
Current Medical Research and Opinion; Tankersley M, Winders T et. al.

Sep 8th, 2021 - The aim of this study was to investigate the time use and both direct and indirect costs associated with subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) for adults with allergic rhinitis (AR) and caregivers of children with AR in the US. We conducted a survey t...

How important is proper dosing for subcutaneous and sublingual allergy immunotherapy?
https://doi.org/10.2500/aap.2021.42.210061
Allergy and Asthma Proceedings; Nelson HS

Sep 4th, 2021 - Background: Results of surveys report that allergists use a wide range of doses for allergy immunotherapy; however, results of randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled studies suggest that the range of the optimum effective dosing is relativel...

To mix or not to mix in allergy immunotherapy vaccines.
https://doi.org/10.1097/ACI.0000000000000784
Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology; Nelson HS

Sep 4th, 2021 - European and US allergists generally do not agree on the approach to subcutaneous allergy immunotherapy in patients with multiple allergies. The North American approach is to treat with a mixture that contains all the allergen extracts to which th...

Meta-analyses of the efficacy of pharmacotherapies and sublingual allergy immunotherapy...
https://doi.org/10.4193/Rhin21.054
Rhinology Meltzer EO, Wallace D et. al.

Sep 1st, 2021 - Treatment options for seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis (SAR/PAR) include pharmacotherapies and allergy immunotherapy. These meta-analyses evaluated the efficacy of pharmacotherapies and sublingual immunotherapy tablets (SLIT-tablets) versu...

Reduced anaphylactic potential of denatured pullulan-conjugated Cry j 1.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2021.108026
International Immunopharmacology; Utsumi D, Sugawara T et. al.

Aug 7th, 2021 - Japanese Cedar (JC) pollinosis is the most common seasonal allergic rhinitis in Japan. Throughout the JC pollen season, patients suffer from the allergic symptoms, resulting in a reduction of quality of life. Allergy immunotherapy (AIT) is an esta...

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News  23 results

There's a Much Safer Food Allergy Immunotherapy. Why Don't More Doctors Offer It?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/954302

Jul 7th, 2021 - This is part 1 of a three-part series. Part 2 is here. Part 3 is here. For the 32 million people in the United States with food allergies, those who seek relief beyond constant vigilance and EpiPens face a confusing treatment landscape. In January...

FDA-Approved Peanut Immunotherapy Protocol Comes With a Cost
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/941016

Nov 15th, 2020 - Peanut allergy immunotherapy now comes with approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but it also comes with protocols, standards, and paperwork. Whether it will be widely adopted has yet to be determined. A few dozen allergists aro...

Don't Endanger Your Patients: Stop Allergy Immunotherapy Now
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/928035

Apr 6th, 2020 - Here in New York City, the US center of the COVID-19 pandemic, I closed my private practice entirely except for telemedicine. In the very early days of this epidemic, I restricted shot hours to avoid overlapping immunotherapy (IT) patients with of...

Don't Endanger Your Patients: Stop Allergy Immunotherapy Now
https://www.staging.medscape.com/viewarticle/928035

Apr 6th, 2020 - Here in New York City, the US center of the COVID-19 pandemic, I closed my private practice entirely except for telemedicine. In the very early days of this epidemic, I restricted shot hours to avoid overlapping immunotherapy (IT) patients with of...

Allergy immunotherapy may modify asthma severity progression
https://www.mdedge.com/chestphysician/article/208885/asthma/allergy-immunotherapy-may-modify-asthma-severity-progression?channel=188
Mark S. Lesney, MDedge News

Sep 26th, 2019 - The use of a grass-based allergy immunotherapy (AIT) lowered the risk of progression from milder to more severe asthma, according to the results of a large, real-world, industry-sponsored, observational study. Photo courtesy Oak Ridge National Lab.

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