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ALLMedicine™ Adie Syndrome Center

Research & Reviews  9 results

Adie syndrome
https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/5749/adie-syndrome

Feb 15th, 2017 - Adie syndrome is is a neurological disorder affecting the pupil of the eye and the autonomic nervous system.[1][2] It is characterized by one eye with a pupil that is larger than normal that constricts slowly in bright light (tonic pupil), along w...

Harlequin syndrome: a mask of rare dysautonomic syndromes.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25933078
Dermatology Online Journal; Kaur S, Aggarwal P et. al.

May 1st, 2015 - Harlequin syndrome (HS) is a rare disorder of the sympathetic nervous system which presents with unilateral decreased sweating and flushing of the face, neck, and chest in response to heat, exercise, or emotional factors. The contralateral side di...

William John Adie: the man behind the syndrome.
https://doi.org/10.1111/ceo.12301
Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; Siddiqui AA, Clarke JC et. al.

Feb 18th, 2014 - William John Adie was an Australian neurologist in the early 20th century responsible for extensively describing the tonically dilated pupil associated with absent deep tendon reflexes - both features of a syndrome that now bears his name. In addi...

Teaching video neuroimages: acute Adie syndrome.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3525299
Neurology Wakerley BR, Tan MH et. al.

Sep 11th, 2012 - Teaching video neuroimages: acute Adie syndrome.|2012|Wakerley BR,Tan MH,Turner MR,|diagnosis,

Idiopathic harlequin syndrome: a pediatric case.
https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073812446484
Journal of Child Neurology; Jain P, Arya R et. al.

May 28th, 2012 - Harlequin syndrome, Harlequin sign, Holmes-Adie syndrome, and Ross syndrome lie on a spectrum of partial dysautonomias affecting facial sudomotor, vasomotor, and pupillary responses. These syndromes have imprecise clinical boundaries and overlap s...

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Clinicaltrials.gov  11 results

An Adult With Unilateral Mydriasis
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/886351_3

Oct 3rd, 2017 - Discussion Tonic pupils were first reported at the turn of the 20th century and were described as tonically dilated and having a delayed reaction to convergence and accommodation.[4] In 1931, the Australian neurologist William John Adie drew atten...

Adie syndrome
https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/5749/adie-syndrome

Feb 15th, 2017 - Adie syndrome is is a neurological disorder affecting the pupil of the eye and the autonomic nervous system.[1][2] It is characterized by one eye with a pupil that is larger than normal that constricts slowly in bright light (tonic pupil), along w...

Harlequin syndrome: a mask of rare dysautonomic syndromes.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25933078
Dermatology Online Journal; Kaur S, Aggarwal P et. al.

May 1st, 2015 - Harlequin syndrome (HS) is a rare disorder of the sympathetic nervous system which presents with unilateral decreased sweating and flushing of the face, neck, and chest in response to heat, exercise, or emotional factors. The contralateral side di...

William John Adie: the man behind the syndrome.
https://doi.org/10.1111/ceo.12301
Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology; Siddiqui AA, Clarke JC et. al.

Feb 18th, 2014 - William John Adie was an Australian neurologist in the early 20th century responsible for extensively describing the tonically dilated pupil associated with absent deep tendon reflexes - both features of a syndrome that now bears his name. In addi...

Teaching video neuroimages: acute Adie syndrome.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3525299
Neurology Wakerley BR, Tan MH et. al.

Sep 11th, 2012 - Teaching video neuroimages: acute Adie syndrome.|2012|Wakerley BR,Tan MH,Turner MR,|diagnosis,

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News  1 results

An Adult With Unilateral Mydriasis
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/886351_3

Oct 3rd, 2017 - Discussion Tonic pupils were first reported at the turn of the 20th century and were described as tonically dilated and having a delayed reaction to convergence and accommodation.[4] In 1931, the Australian neurologist William John Adie drew atten...

see more →