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About 14,550 results

Post-PCI Rx Adherence; Stroke Scan Boom; Ultrasound-Responsive DCB
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/pci/83073

Oct 31st, 2019 - Adherence to medical therapy worsened over time following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to data from the Veteran Affairs. Five years after discharge, adherence rates had dropped roughly 15 percentage points for statins, β-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and by almost 70 points for P2Y12 inhibitors. (Circulation: Cardiov...

Watchman: Sicker Patients, More Deaths Than in Trials
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/pci/83071

Oct 31st, 2019 - Medicare patients undergoing left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion with the Watchman device in routine practice tended to be sicker than the trial populations, translating into higher mortality rates in the real world, researchers found. Among more than 13,000 Medicare beneficiaries with atrial fibrillation (Afib) who underwent LAA closure for stroke prevention, death and readmission rates were...

Venous Closure Device Gets EP Patients Moving Sooner, With Less Pain
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/pci/83050

Oct 30th, 2019 - A resorbable collagen plug venous closure device got patients on their feet faster than did manual compression alone after a catheter-based electrophysiology procedure, according to the AMBULATE trial. Vascular closure with the Vascade MVP device led to faster recovery after cardiac ablation, and with less pain medication use, than seen with randomization to manual compression: Time to ambulati...

Cardioversion After Watchman Implant May Not Require More OAC
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/pci/83020

Oct 29th, 2019 - Electrical cardioversion without routine extra anticoagulation around the procedure may be feasible for people who've already received left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion, according to a small retrospective study. Patients with a Watchman implant who received direct current cardioversion for atrial fibrillation (Afib) did not experience any thromboembolic complications from the procedure, rep...

A Cardiologist's Diet Built for Improving Cholesterol
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/dyslipidemia/83011

Oct 29th, 2019 - As a cardiologist, patients often ask me for ways to lower their cholesterol without taking statins. They wonder how effective and viable alternatives can be and what strategies they can use to lower their cholesterol in other ways. I often tell my patients at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center that diet is key. A focus on a plant-based diet, reducing saturated fat, and increasing ...

Data Security Bad for MI Survival? Best Post-Op Bleed Tx; GWTG Public Reporting
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/prevention/83013

Oct 29th, 2019 - After ransomware attacks or other hacks, hospitals' heart attack mortality rates are higher, speculated to be due to delays in care from stronger passwords and other cybersecurity remediation. (PBS.org) Subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators may have a special advantage for adults with congenital heart disease, who may have limited or no venous access to the heart, but nearly half...

Afib Ablation Deaths Do Happen
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/pci/83006

Oct 28th, 2019 - It would be wrong to count out death as a risk of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (Afib), according to real-world data. Early procedure-related mortality, occurring during index admission or readmission within 30 days after discharge, occurred in 0.46% of the 60,203 cases recorded in the Nationwide Readmissions Database in 2010-2015. That rate "exceeds the rates of procedural death rep...

Aortic Stenosis in FH; Plaque Erosion; CAD Wave Intensity Analysis
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/pci/82923

Oct 24th, 2019 - Familial hypercholesterolemia comes with higher risk of aortic stenosis compared to the general population, according to a Norwegian registry study. Whether early initiation of LDL cholesterol-lowering therapy could prevent aortic stenosis might be ideally tested in this group, investigators concluded. (JAMA Cardiology) The retrograde approach was associated with more in-hospital major complica...

Best Time to Take HTN Meds? Now There's Evidence
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/hypertension/82906

Oct 23rd, 2019 - Antihypertensive medications are better taken before bed than are upon awakening in the morning, according to a Spanish multicenter trial. Night-time blood pressure (BP) drug regimens nearly halved risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) death, MI, coronary revascularization, heart failure, or stroke compared with day-time regimens over a median of 6.3 years (adjusted HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.50-0.61). E...

Cardiologists: Key Players in T2D Care 'Medical Neighborhood'
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/diabetes/82902

Oct 23rd, 2019 - In a count of U.S. specialists able to give type 2 diabetes care in the U.S., cardiologists came out on top, researchers reported. Topping off at nearly 23,000 cardiologists across the U.S. in 2016, there were an estimated 81 incident diabetes cases per cardiologist that year, ranging from 30:1 in the District of Columbia to 154:1 in Alaska, according to Ravi Patel, MD, of the Northwestern Univ...

After Cardiac Valve Surgery, Too Few Go to Rehab
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/prevention/82884

Oct 23rd, 2019 - Patients fresh out of cardiac valve surgery are no exception to the general underutilization of cardiac rehabilitation in the U.S., according to an observational cohort study. Enrolling in a comprehensive program of supervised exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, and psychosocial support was associated with reduced risks of re-hospitalization (adjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.63-0.69) and mort...

Tick-Based Antithrombotic; Bove Obituary; Ear Clip Prevents Post-Op Afib?
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/prevention/82867

Oct 22nd, 2019 - A protein used by ticks to facilitate sucking our blood may actually be a good antithrombotic that doesn't promote bleeding, based on a rabbit model of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (Journal of the American College of Cardiology) Alfred Bove, MD, PhD, past president of the American College of Cardiology, passed away Oct. 17 at the age of 81. (Cardiovascular Business) The FIND FH machine-learn...

Depression Intervention Flops for Heart Attack Survivors
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/prevention/82853

Oct 21st, 2019 - A comprehensive depression screening and treatment program didn't help acute coronary syndrome (ACS) survivors more than usual care or what they could achieve on their own, a 1,500-person trial showed. Mean quality-adjusted life-years fell by an identical 0.06 over 18 months whether patients were randomized to systematic depression screening plus notification of primary care clinicians and trea...

Oral Anticoagulant Choice Matters in Bone Health, Study Finds
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/prevention/82848

Oct 21st, 2019 - Bone fractures are a risk to be considered when choosing the oral anticoagulant for a patient with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (Afib), a study suggested. The risk of poor osteoporotic outcomes was significantly lower with direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) compared with vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy, as follows: Any fracture: 3.09% vs 3.77% (adjusted HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74-0.97) Major ost...

Farxiga Approved to Cut HF Admission Risk in T2D
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/chf/82845

Oct 20th, 2019 - The FDA approved dapagliflozin (Farxiga) to reduce heart failure (HF) hospitalization risk in adults with type 2 diabetes at elevated risk due to established cardiovascular disease or multiple risk factors for it, AstraZeneca announced. Dapagliflozin is the first selective inhibitor of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) to gain that particular supplemental indication. Just last month, SGLT2...

Gut Hormone in Acute MI; Pediatric TAVR; Smokeless Tobacco
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/pci/82802

Oct 17th, 2019 - Gut insulin secretion hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 added incremental prognostic value to the GRACE score in assessing cardiovascular risk among patients with acute MI, found a study in European Heart Journal. A pharmacoinvasive strategy with tenecteplase bested primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for the treatment of ST-segment elevation MI in an observational study of over 5,50...

Starting Statin in Childhood Protects FH Hearts
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/dyslipidemia/82774

Oct 16th, 2019 - Statin use started in childhood for familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) kept atherosclerotic plaque levels normal and was associated with better outcomes in adulthood, long-term follow-up of a clinical trial cohort showed. Mean progression of carotid intima-media thickness was similar for these patients as for their siblings without FH (0.0056 vs 0.0057 mm per year) and remained nonsignificantly...

College Football: Literally Heartbreaking for Players?
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/prevention/82769

Oct 16th, 2019 - College football players in a longitudinal study tended to follow a trajectory of cardiovascular (CV) changes leading to a specific kind of adverse CV remodeling. Over the course of 3 years of college football, after adjusting for race, height, and player position, players had significant changes from the beginning of freshman year: Systolic blood pressure: average increase of 11.6 mm Hg (P<0.0...

Study: Certain Heart Meds Linked to Suicide
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/hypertension/82759

Oct 16th, 2019 - Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) were associated with a higher risk of death by suicide compared with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, according to a Canadian population-based study of seniors. The excess risk (adjusted OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.33-2.00) persisted even after a sensitivity analysis excluding people with a history of self-harm (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.29-1.98), reported Tony...

Life Support for Heart Tx Survival Rate; Oral Care Cuts BP; Portable ECMO
https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/prevention/82742

Oct 15th, 2019 - Ape and gorilla hearts look more like those of strength-trained or sedentary humans and less like those who run or do endurance activity, the New York Times reports. Newark Beth Israel Medical Center kept a heart transplant patient on life support for a year after he didn't wake up from the surgery -- all to prop up the program's survival rate. The hospital may have similarly tailored care for ...