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About 398,908 results

Sotatercept May Have Long Term Benefit in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
https://www.pulmonologyadvisor.com/home/topics/pulmonary-hypertension/sotatercept-may-have-long-term-benefit-in-pulmonary-arterial-hypertension/
Pulmonology Advisor

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Long-term use of sotatercept may allow patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) to maintain significantly reduced pulmonary vascular resistance, according to results of an 18- to 24- month open-label extension trial published in The European Respiratory Journal. The previously conducted 24-week, placebo-controlled, phase 2 PULSAR clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT0349...

APP Leaders Discuss What Keeps Them Up at Night
https://www.clinicaladvisor.com/home/topics/practice-management-information-center/national-app-week-panel/
Clinical Advisor

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Presidents from 5 advanced practice provider (APP) associations shined a light on strategies to increase the health care workforce, key bills that may change the practice landscape, how to create greater diversity among practitioners, and what keeps them up at night at an online panel discussion held in honor of the second annual National APP Week. The presidents all noted access to care issues...

Monkeypox Outbreak Can Still Be Contained, Says Columbia Epidemiologist
https://www.rheumatologyadvisor.com/general-medicine/monkeypox-outbreak-contained-columbia-epidemiologist/
Rheumatology Advisor

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Health officials worldwide can still take steps to contain the monkeypox outbreak, says Dr Alissa Davis, Associate Professor at the Columbia School of Social Work, but it will require addressing the challenges of stigma, misinformation, and health inequity. “Overall case numbers of monkeypox are growing, although the number of new infections has recently been trending downward,” says Davis, an ...

ACR Updates Guidelines for Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis
https://www.clinicaladvisor.com/home/topics/rheumatology-information-center/acr-updates-guidelines-for-prevention-and-treatment-of-glucocorticoid-induced-osteoporosis/
Clinical Advisor

Oct 3rd, 2022 - The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) updated their 2017 ACR guidelines for preventing and treating glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP). The full manuscript will be published in Arthritis & Rheumatology and Arthritis Care and Research in early 2023. Since the publication of the 2017 ACR guidelines for GIOP, treatments, including abaloparatide (PTHrP) and romosozumab, have been avail...

Worldwide trial seeks to revolutionize pediatric leukemia care
https://www.mdedge.com/hematology-oncology/article/258363/aml/worldwide-trial-seeks-revolutionize-pediatric-leukemia-care
Randy Dotinga

Oct 3rd, 2022 - While great strides have been made in children’s leukemia care during the past 50 years, statistics have remained grim. For acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common type, 5-year survival rates were just 69% for children younger than 15 between 2009 and 2015.

Novel Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation Approach Effective in Relapsed/Refractory Severe Aplastic Anemia
https://www.thecardiologyadvisor.com/home/topics/transplantation/aplastic-anemia-haploidentical-bone-marrow-transplant-approach-effective/
Cardiology Advisor

Oct 3rd, 2022 - According to research published in Lancet Haematology, a novel approach to haploidentical bone marrow transplantation results in excellent overall survival (OS) with minimal graft vs host disease (GVHD) in patients with relapsed or refractory severe aplastic anemia and may now be considered a standard salvage treatment for the disorder. The researchers reported the outcomes of BMT CTN 1502, a s...

Hepatitis C in Patients With HIV Increases Age-Related Cardiovascular Disease Risk
https://www.thecardiologyadvisor.com/general-cardiology/cardiovascular-disease-myocardial-infarction-risk-hiv-hepatitis-c-coinfection/
Cardiology Advisor

Oct 3rd, 2022 - The association between increasing age and risk for type 1 myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with HIV is more significant among those with vs without hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, suggesting that HCV status should be considered when evaluating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in this patient population. These study findings were published in The Journal of the American Heart Associ...

Positive psychiatry: An introduction
https://www.mdedge.com/psychiatry/article/258302/positive-psychiatry-introduction
Erick Messias, MD, PhD, MPH, Dilip V. Jeste, MD

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Historically, psychology and psychiatry have mostly focused on negative emotions and pathological states. However, during the last few decades, new developments in both disciplines have created novel vistas for a more comprehensive understanding of human behavior.

More on varenicline
https://www.mdedge.com/psychiatry/article/258307/addiction-medicine
Ian R. Tofler, MBBS

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Murray et al have written a timely, thoughtful, and useful article (“Smoking cessation: Varenicline and the risk of neuropsychiatric adverse events,” Current Psychiatry, July 2022, p. 41-45) about the role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist varenicline for helping patients stop smoking, which is still the main preventable cause of morbidity and premature death.

Faulty fences: Blood-brain barrier dysfunction in schizophrenia
https://www.mdedge.com/psychiatry/article/258308/schizophrenia-other-psychotic-disorders/faulty-fences-blood-brain-barrier
Delaney A. Schrenk, BS, Henry A. Nasrallah, MD

Oct 3rd, 2022 - The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an essential barrier of closely spaced cells that regulates entry into the CNS. What passes should be highly regulated to protect the brain from potentially harmful peripheral cells or molecules from the rest of the body.

The State of the Art in NAFLD/NASH Identification and Management
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/978316

Oct 3rd, 2022 - This transcript has been edited for clarity. Seth J. Baum, MD, FACC, FAHA, FNLA, FASPC: Hi. My name is Seth Baum. I'm a preventive cardiologist and clinical lipidologist, the chief scientific officer for Flourish Research, and a past president of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology. I'm joined today by Dr Jay Shubrook, who is an expert in diabetes, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)...

Fast Five Quiz: Monkeypox
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981391

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Caused by the same family of viruses (Poxviridae) as the variola virus, monkeypox was discovered in 1958 after outbreaks occurred among research monkeys. It was first identified in humans in 1970. Before the 2022 outbreak, nearly all cases seen outside Africa were linked to the continent via travel or animal export. However, data suggest that men who have sex with men (MSM) account for a sizeab...

Are Nasal Sprays the Future for the COVID Vaccine?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981773

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Are nasal sprays the future of COVID-19 vaccines? That’s certainly the hope of many researchers working on new kinds of inoculation. Nasal vaccines were recently approved in China and India for use as a booster dose. The Chinese vaccine is inhaled through the mouth and nose, whereas the Indian vaccine is delivered through nasal drops. These vaccines are just two of more than 100 oral or nasal v...

Is Medical Cannabis the Answer to the Opioid Crisis?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981767

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Medical cannabis may be an important alternative to opioids for pain management, new research suggests. In a large survey, patients with a variety of ailments, including pain and mental health problems, reported less pain and better functioning, after using medical cannabis — and most were able to stop or cut back on their opioid use. "Some patients wish to move away from opioid-based pain medi...

Ancient DNA Discoveries Lead to Nobel Prize in Medicine and Help Explain How Humans Evolved
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981774

Oct 3rd, 2022 - The Nobel Committee announced today it was awarding Professor Svante Pääbo the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2022 for his "pioneering research" into ancient DNA. It all started with a 40,000-year-old bone. That Neanderthal bone contained enough DNA that Pääbo could start decades of research showing us modern humans, Homo sapiens, are genetically distinct from other now-extinct homin...

Why Private Practice Will Always Survive; What Makes Some Infections Asymptomatic?; Cancer's Emotional Toll
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981684

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Why Private Practice Will Always Survive Employed physicians are often torn. Many relish the steady salary and ability to focus on being a physician rather than handle administrative duties but bemoan their employers' rules and their lack of input into key decisions. Seven physicians talked to Medscape Medical News about why they chose private practice. Greater control: Some physicians chose pr...

Top pregnancy apps for your patients
https://www.mdedge.com/obgyn/article/258358/obstetrics
Gabriela Frid, BS, Katherine T. Chen, MD, MPH

Oct 2nd, 2022 - Pregnancy apps are more popular as patients use the internet to seek information about pregnancy and childbirth. 1 Research has shown that over 50% of pregnant patients download apps focused on pregnancy, with an average of 3 being tried.

Drug combo holds promise of better AML outcomes
https://www.mdedge.com/hematology-oncology/article/258347/aml/drug-combo-holds-promise-better-aml-outcomes
Randy Dotinga

Sep 30th, 2022 - Adding venetoclax (Venclexta) to a gilteritinib (Xospata) regimen appeared to improve outcomes in refractory/relapsed FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a new industry-funded phase 1b study reported. “The combination of venetoclax and gilteritinib is a highly active and tolerable oral combination regimen that potentially improves response frequency and depth over existing standards in a.

Racial disparities in preventive services use seen among patients with spina bifida or cerebral palsy
https://www.mdedge.com/internalmedicine/article/258337/business-medicine/racial-disparities-preventive-services-use-seen
Eliza Partika

Sep 30th, 2022 - Black and Hispanic adults with spina bifida or cerebral palsy are less likely to attend wellness visits than are White adults with the same pediatric-onset disabilities, a new study finds. Black adults also had lower odds of having a bone density screening, compared with White adults.

Health Effects of Wildfires: Recent Research and What Clinicians Need to Know
https://www.pulmonologyadvisor.com/home/general-pulmonology/health-effects-of-wildfires-recent-research-and-what-clinicians-need-to-know/
Pulmonology Advisor

Sep 30th, 2022 - More than 1100 wildfires burned in the US during the month of September, according to the Fire, Weather, and Avalanche Center1 — a situation that, according to research, causes more people with asthma, other respiratory issues, and heart conditions to show up at doctors’ offices, emergency departments, and hospitals. The particulate matter generated by wildfires is especially hazardous for chil...