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About 332,423 results

How Blunt Is Too Blunt for Informed Consent?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984914

Dec 2nd, 2022 - Sitting across from a patient explaining a complicated treatment proposal, protocol, or medication may be one of the most complex yet crucial tasks you have as a physician. Although informed consent is at the forefront of shared decisions between you and your patient, there's a fine line between providing enough information on the risks and benefits of a particular treatment and knowing you've ...

Unique Nationwide Screening Program Fails to Move the Needle on CVD Risk Factors
https://www.medpagetoday.com/primarycare/preventivecare/102002

Dec 1st, 2022 - Japan's mass screening and counseling intervention resulted in only modest population-wide improvements in obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, a study showed. Among over 3.4 million men and 2.3 million women, those who met the threshold for high waist circumference with high blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, or dyslipidemia and received lifestyle guidance and counse...

Ultrasound-Guided Saline Hydrodissection Promising for Carpal Tunnel
https://www.medpagetoday.com/orthopedics/orthopedics/101999

Dec 1st, 2022 - CHICAGO -- Treating carpal tunnel syndrome with ultrasound (US)-guided hydrodissection with a saline injection improved function and delivered pain relief, according to a randomized trial. Patients in the three-arm study received either US-guided hydrodissection with normal saline alone, US-guided hydrodissection with both saline and steroids, or guided perineural steroids alone. At week 4, all...

FDA Greenlights First Fecal Microbiota Product
https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/generalinfectiousdisease/101991

Dec 1st, 2022 - The FDA has approved the first-ever fecal microbiota product, the agency announced on Wednesday. Rebyota was approved to prevent the recurrence of Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile) infection in adults who have already completed a course of antibiotics for recurrent C. difficile; it is not indicated for the first occurrence of C. difficile. The fecal microbiota product is prepared from sto...

Year in Review: Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma
https://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/lymphoma/101996

Dec 1st, 2022 - Second-line treatment for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) got a big boost in 2022 with new indications for a pair of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies, while an antibody-drug conjugate moved one step closer to shaking up treatment in the first-line setting. CAR-T Products Move to Second-Line In April, axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel; Yescarta) became the first CAR T-cell t...

Four Eyes Are Not Better Than Two for COVID-19 Protection
https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/101995

Dec 1st, 2022 - Wearing glasses in public for 2 weeks did not protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection, a Norwegian pragmatic randomized trial showed. Among more than 3,700 participants, 3.7% of those randomized to wear sunglasses or other types of glasses in the community reported a positive COVID test to the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases compared with 3.5% of those in the control group ...

Fewer Neonatal Risks With Buprenorphine for Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy
https://www.medpagetoday.com/obgyn/pregnancy/101994

Dec 1st, 2022 - Buprenorphine treatment for pregnant patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) was linked with fewer neonatal risks compared with methadone therapy, but had similar maternal outcomes, an analysis of Medicaid data found. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) occurred in 52% of infants whose mothers took buprenorphine in the 30 days before delivery compared with 69% of those whose mothers took methado...

Moderna Exec Says COVID Trials Improved Diversity Recruiting
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984827

Dec 1st, 2022 - NEW YORK (Reuters) - Moderna Inc's top scientist said on Tuesday that the vaccine maker has learned how to better recruit from diverse populations for its clinical trials from running its COVID-19 vaccine studies. Moderna Chief Medical Officer Paul Burton, speaking at the Reuters NEXT conference in New York, said that in 2020 the company needed to slow enrollment in its initial COVID-19 vaccine...

How Can Clinicians Distinguish Food Allergy and GERD in Young Kids?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984898

Dec 1st, 2022 - The debate about a possible link between food allergy (FA) and pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continues, and more, better-designed research is needed, a position paper by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology reports. The report offers consensus-based recommendations and a graphical decision pathway to guide providers through assessing and treating food aller...

ICIs Increase Risk for Brain Injury From Cranial Radiotherapy
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984895

Dec 1st, 2022 - The study covered in this summary was published on researchsquare.com as a preprint and has not yet been peer reviewed. Key Takeaway Immune checkpoint inhibitors increase the risk for brain injury among patients with lung cancer who receive cranial radiotherapy to treat brain metastases, especially when immunotherapy is used within 3 months of radiotherapy. Why This Matters Cranial radiotherapy...

China Launches Elderly Vaccination Drive but Health Fears Linger
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984834

Dec 1st, 2022 - SHANGHAI (Reuters) - As China works to raise COVID-19 vaccination rates among its elderly, essential if the country is to open up again and live with COVID, many older people remain fearful that the treatment will make them sick. "If I were fit for vaccination, I would definitely get it," said Cai Shiyu, a 70-year-old retiree in Shanghai. "But I've had a heart stent, and I have heart disease, a...

Male Infertility: A Threat to the Human Race?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984842

Dec 1st, 2022 - A large-scale meta-analysis has confirmed that there has been a drop in average sperm counts in men — a situation affecting countries around the world and that shows no sign of slowing down. Jean-Marc Ayoubi, MD, head of the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine at Foch Hospital in Suresnes, France, gives us the inside story. In 1973, the average sperm count in men w...

FDA OKs First Fecal Transplant Therapy for Recurrent C difficile
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984848

Dec 1st, 2022 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first fecal microbiota product to prevent recurrence of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) in people aged 18 years and older. Rebyota (fecal microbiota, live-jslm), from Ferring Pharmaceuticals, is intended for use after an individual has completed antibiotic treatment for recurrent CDI. It is not indicated for the first occurrenc...

AI ‘Simulants’ Could Save Time and Money on New Medications
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984855

Dec 1st, 2022 - Artificial intelligence is poised to make clinical trials and drug development faster, cheaper, and more efficient. Part of this strategy is creating "synthetic control arms" that use data to create “simulants,” or computer-generated “patients” in a trial.  This way, researchers can enroll fewer real people and recruit enough participants in half the time.  Both patients and drug companies stan...

Tamoxifen Ups Risk of Uterine Disease, Endometrial Cancer
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984846

Dec 1st, 2022 - Tamoxifen treatment for premenopausal women with breast cancer is independently associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer and other uterine diseases, according to findings from a large retrospective study of Korean women. After adjusting for multiple confounding variables, tamoxifen users had an almost fourfold increased risk of endometrial cancer compared with nonusers. Overall, ...

How to Diagnose Circulatory Disorders in Diabetes
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984854

Dec 1st, 2022 - "In Germany, a patient dies every 20 minutes from mostly vascular-related events caused by diabetes," said Berthold Amann, MD, conference president of the German Society for Angiology (DGA). He spoke at the press conference of the Diabetes Autumn Conference of the German Diabetes Society (DDG), which was held in cooperation with the DGA. Because stenoses and occlusions in the arteries of the pe...

Review Gives Weight to Supplements for Hair Loss  
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984874

Dec 1st, 2022 - A systematic review of nutritional supplements for hair loss finds that a wide range of the products have potential but that the studies could not provide definitive evidence of safety and effectiveness because of small sample sizes, heterogeneity of hair loss types in study subjects, or other limitations. The review published online in JAMA Dermatology on November 30, notes that "Twelve of the...

Both Potatoes and Beans Reduced Insulin Resistance, Weight in Controlled Study
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984876

Dec 1st, 2022 - Low energy–density diets that are based either on potatoes or beans similarly reduced insulin resistance in adults with poor blood glucose control, according to a controlled feeding study in 36 individuals. Potatoes have gotten a bad rap for their high glycemic index, but they have little fat and a low energy density, wrote the study investigators. In fact, "cooling of gelatinized potatoes gene...

TikTok Creates Ozempic Shortage; New MS Framework Proposed; and AI May Cut Bias in Drug Trials
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984741

Dec 1st, 2022 - TikTok Creates Ozempic Shortage TikTok is fueling demand for Ozempic, creating shortages of the diabetes drug now used for weight loss. Videos on TikTok hashtagged #ozempic have amassed more than 275 million views, and #ozempicweightloss has more than 110 million. The trend follows social media posts by celebrities such as Kim Kardashian and Elon Musk touting their own use of the drug or weight...

One in Three Patients With Unstable Pelvic Fractures Die, Study Shows
https://www.medpagetoday.com/criticalcare/generalcriticalcare/101973

Nov 30th, 2022 - Despite use of advanced hemorrhage control interventions, more than one in three patients with hemodynamically unstable pelvic fractures died, a retrospective cohort study showed. Among nearly 1,400 patients who received early transfusions and at least one invasive pelvic hemorrhage control intervention, the 24-hour mortality rate was 15.5%, the emergency department mortality rate was 0.7%, and...