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About 11,610 results

In Crafting Successful Public Health Campaigns, Music Strikes a Lasting Chord
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/980647

Oct 6th, 2022 - This transcript has been edited for clarity. Hello. I'm Benjamin Levy, a gastroenterologist at the University of Chicago. As a music major and premedical student at the University of Virginia, I started organizing concerts. Afterward, I completed a Fulbright fellowship in Paris with the Orchestre de Paris and the Paris Opera. Over the past 15 years, I've been lucky to combine my passions for mu...

Accepting Obesity Shouldn't Stop Us From Warning of Its Dangers
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/980883

Oct 6th, 2022 - This transcript has been edited for clarity. Hi, I'm Art Caplan. I'm at the Division of Medical Ethics at New York University Grossman School of Medicine. I'm going to enter into a topic that is really fraught with emotions, strong feelings, and worries, which is the topic of obesity. I decided to talk to you about this because I was watching the Emmy Awards on TV and I noticed two things. One,...

New Consensus on Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease Together
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981891

Oct 5th, 2022 - The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) organization have together spelled out broad agreement on how clinicians should now manage patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a new consensus report published online October 3 in  Diabetes Care and Kidney International. The report focuses on how to use available diabetes med...

The CDC Scientist Who Couldn't Get Monkeypox Treatment
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981909

Oct 5th, 2022 - On a Monday morning in mid-July, William L. Jeffries IV decided it was time to call a colleague for help. Jeffries is a senior health scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, where he researches the ways that racism and homophobia impact health in the United States. Jeffries, who describes himself as a same-gender-loving Black man, sees the work as a way to serve ...

Is Continuous Glucose Monitoring for Everyone With Diabetes?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981908

Oct 5th, 2022 - STOCKHOLM, Sweden — Whether continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is for "all" — and if not, for whom — was the topic of a lively debate at the recent European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2022 Annual Meeting. In the debate, the two participants generally agreed that CGM is appropriate for all people with type 1 diabetes and those with type 2 diabetes on intensive insulin regimens...

Higher Levels of Omega-3 Linked to Better Brain Health in Midlife
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981906

Oct 5th, 2022 - Consuming higher levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with larger hippocampal volumes and better abstract reasoning in healthy middle-aged adults, new research shows. Dr Claudia Satizabal The results suggest the brain-boosting benefits of omega-3 PUFAs begin in midlife, lead study author Claudia L. Satizabal, PhD, assistant professor, Department of Population Heal...

Street Medicine Reaches People Where They Live
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981831

Oct 4th, 2022 - One summer evening, on his regular rounds through the streets of Syracuse, NY, David Lehmann, MD, PharmD, came across an unsheltered man in dirty clothes who seemed to be making his bed each night on the pavement where he stood. An exam in the privacy of the medical van revealed a painful, infected boil on the man's backside. After some coaxing, Lehmann lanced the infected sore, gave medicine a...

Newer Drugs Not Cost-Effective for First-Line Diabetes Therapy
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981829

Oct 4th, 2022 - To be cost-effective compared with metformin for initial therapy for type 2 diabetes, prices for a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor or a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist would have to fall by at least 70% and at least 90%, respectively, according to estimates. The study, modeled on US patients, by Jin G. Choi, MD, and colleagues, was published online October 3 in the Anna...

Online Tool Predicts Complications From Hysterectomy
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981833

Oct 4th, 2022 - An online prediction tool provides personalized risk estimates to help clinicians and patients choose between laparoscopic and abdominal surgery for hysterectomy for benign disease. The tool, which integrates 11 routinely available predictors, had "acceptable" predictive ability and "moderate" discrimination. Krupa Madhvani "The overall numbers of hysterectomies are declining, and there are als...

Comparing Prevention and Neurostimulation for Dementia
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981837

Oct 4th, 2022 - New data from the United States bolster the case for dementia prevention. At the same time, noninvasive stimulation procedures are still not being used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) in day-to-day clinical practice. Since it will still be a long time until effective antidementia medication is successfully developed, dementia researchers and health officials have emphasized the prevention of ...

Dive Right in! Cold Water Swims Bring Many Health Benefits
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981840

Oct 4th, 2022 - Every Sunday from November to April Dennis Thomas starts his day by hitting the beach at Coney Island for a dip in the frigid Atlantic Ocean — no matter how low the mercury plummets. Thomas, president of the Coney Island Polar Bear Club, says these winter swims offer more than just a bracing rush of adrenaline. He believes they're the reason that, at age 67, he is fiddle-fit physically, tack-sh...

Bariatric Surgery May Up Risk for Epilepsy
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981843

Oct 4th, 2022 - Bariatric surgery may raise the risk of developing epilepsy, new research suggests. Analyzing health records, investigators compared almost 17,000 patients who had undergone bariatric surgery with more than 620,000 individuals with obesity who had not undergone the surgery. During a minimum 3-year follow-up period, the surgery group had a 45% higher risk of developing epilepsy than the nonsurge...

Racial Disparities in Preventive Services Use Seen Among Patients With Spina Bifida or Cerebral Palsy
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981853

Oct 4th, 2022 - Black and Hispanic adults with spina bifida or cerebral palsy are less likely to attend wellness visits than are White adults with the same pediatric-onset disabilities, a new study finds. Black adults also had lower odds of having a bone density screening, compared with White adults. Plus, comorbidities were highest among the Black patients, according to the paper, which was published in Annal...

The State of the Art in NAFLD/NASH Identification and Management
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/978316

Oct 3rd, 2022 - This transcript has been edited for clarity. Seth J. Baum, MD, FACC, FAHA, FNLA, FASPC: Hi. My name is Seth Baum. I'm a preventive cardiologist and clinical lipidologist, the chief scientific officer for Flourish Research, and a past president of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology. I'm joined today by Dr Jay Shubrook, who is an expert in diabetes, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)...

The Private Market Is No Place for COVID-19 Countermeasures
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981776

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, the U.S. federal government has supervised the purchasing and distribution of vaccines, tests, and treatments. Many Americans saw for the first time what publicly funded healthcare could do as citizens were able to access prevention and treatment without for-pro...

Obesity in Asian American Subgroups Varies, Starts at Lower BMI
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981814

Oct 3rd, 2022 - Obesity and the associated increased risk for cardiometabolic disease is missed in Asian Americans when using the standard body mass index (BMI) cutoff for obesity rather than a suggested lower threshold for obesity in Asians, new research in an American Asian population showed. Moreover, the study showed that the six largest subgroups of Asian Americans — Asian Indian, Japanese, Filipino, Chin...

Improve Diagnosis of Type of Heart Failure Common in Diabetes
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981717

Sep 30th, 2022 - STOCKHOLM — Recent study results confirm that two agents from the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor class can significantly cut the incidence of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFpEF), a disease especially common in people with type 2 diabetes, obesity, or both. And findings from secondary analyses of the studies ― incl...

Gender-Based Violence Is a Cardiovascular Risk Factor
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981721

Sep 30th, 2022 - Gender-based violence should be considered a risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases such as broken heart syndrome, according to Eunice Tavarez, MD, an internist cardiologist from the Dominican Republic. She affirms that long-term patient follow-up should also be carried out because the heart problems can reoccur. During the ACC Latin America 2022 Together With CardioAcademic confere...

Strong Link Found Between Enterovirus and Type 1 Diabetes
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981726

Sep 30th, 2022 - STOCKHOLM, Sweden — Enterovirus infection appears to be strongly linked to both type 1 diabetes and islet cell autoantibodies, new research suggests. The strength of the relationship, particularly within the first month of type 1 diabetes diagnosis, "further supports the rationale for development of enterovirus-targeted vaccines and antiviral therapy to prevent and reduce the impact of type 1 d...

Once-Weekly Insulin Promising in Phase 3 Trial in Type 2 Diabetes
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981623

Sep 29th, 2022 - STOCKHOLM, Sweden — The investigational once-weekly insulin icodec (Novo Nordisk) significantly reduces A1c without increasing hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes, the first Phase 3 data of such an insulin formulation suggest. The data are from one of six trials in the company's ONWARDS program. "Once-weekly insulin may redefine diabetes management," enthused Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD,...