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About 11,855 results

Pandemic Adds More Weight to Burden of Obesity in Children
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/961021

Oct 15th, 2021 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. American children gained a lot of weight in the last year, setting a dangerous trajectory towards metabolic disease that requires urgent policy change, according to a new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. "Our nation's safety net is fragile, outdated, and out of reach for millions ...

Higher Risk of Chronic Disease in Trans vs Cisgender Individuals
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960762

Oct 13th, 2021 - A new study that looked at a large database of privately insured Americans has found that transgender individuals have a higher risk of chronic disease than their cisgender counterparts. Transgender people had higher rates of cardiovascular, neurologic, and endocrine conditions, mental health and substance use disorders, chronic pulmonary disease, anemia, liver disease, renal failure, rheumatoi...

New FDA Guidance Aims to Cut Sodium in Processed Foods
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960788

Oct 13th, 2021 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued voluntary, short-term sodium reduction targets for food manufacturers, chain restaurants, and food service operators for processed, packaged, and prepared foods, with an eye toward reducing diet-related conditions such as heart disease and obesity. According to the FDA, more than 70% of total sodium intake is from sodium added during food man...

Overweight/Obesity Is Common in T1D and a Risk Factor for Double Diabetes
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960684

Oct 12th, 2021 - Takeaway Overweight/obesity was very common in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and was associated with double diabetes (DD). Body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with total daily insulin dose in patients with T1DM. DD was linked to an adverse cardiovascular risk profile and was common in lean patients with T1DM. Why this matters Findings warrant further research to dete...

High-Dose Omega-3s Tied to Higher Risk for Atrial Fibrillation
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960606?src=

Oct 11th, 2021 - Taking high-doses of marine omega-3 fatty acids, more than 1 gram daily, may raise the risk for atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a meta-analysis of relevant research.  However, the risk of developing AF appears to be "relatively small" for those taking 1 gram or less of fish oil per day, Christine Albert, MD, chair of the  Department of Cardiology at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Si...

High-Dose Omega-3s Tied to Higher Risk for Atrial Fibrillation
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960606

Oct 11th, 2021 - Taking high-doses of marine omega-3 fatty acids, more than 1 gram daily, may raise the risk for atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a meta-analysis of relevant research.  However, the risk of developing AF appears to be "relatively small" for those taking 1 gram or less of fish oil per day, Christine Albert, MD, chair of the  Department of Cardiology at the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Si...

The Stroke–obesity Paradox Becomes Evident in yet Another Study
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960408

Oct 7th, 2021 - Takeaway Overweight or obesity may be linked to a more favourable prognosis for subsequent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and mortality in stroke survivors, regardless of confounding variables at the time of stroke. The authors warn that the stroke–obesity paradox is strictly an association and should not be considered causal. Why this matters Ther...

GI Cancer and Obesity: Fighting One Means Addressing the Other
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/959973

Oct 6th, 2021 - By 2030, it is projected that most Americans will be overweight, and of those, nearly 50% of adults will be obese. Although the majority of Americans are aware that obesity can have adverse health consequences, survey findings show that few are aware that it can increase cancer risk. The link between weight and cancer may not be linear, yet large-scale epidemiologic studies have demonstrated a ...

'Public Health Emergency' Declared With 1 in 10 Adults Having Diabetes by 2030
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960340

Oct 6th, 2021 - Nearly 1 in 10 of the UK's adult population will be living with diabetes by the end of the decade, if further action to prevent and treat both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is not taken, shows an analysis by Diabetes UK. Further to the projected 5.5 million adults (10% projected adult population) who could be living with diabetes by 2030, an extra 17 million people could also be at increased risk ...

Ketosis, Including Ketogenic Diets, Implicated in Prurigo Pigmentosa
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960249

Oct 5th, 2021 - Prurigo pigmentosa, an uncommon inflammatory skin condition also known as Nagashima disease, is growing in frequency, possibly as a result of increased interest in the ketogenic diet, according to a dermatologist, who reviewed skin conditions common to patients of Asian descent at the Skin of Color Update 2021. "Ketogenic diets are gaining popularity globally for weight loss. After 2-4 weeks [o...

Obesity in Type 1 Diabetes: A Two-Way Road Filled With Potholes
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960262

Oct 5th, 2021 - Obesity in people with type 1 diabetes hasn't been a focus of research or clinical management in the past, but experts in the United States and Europe now recognize it as a unique problem and are beginning to take a closer look at options for prevention and management. Bart Van der Schueren, MD, PhD, of the department of endocrinology at University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium, gave a talk entitle...

Racism a Strong Factor in Black Women's High Rate of Premature Births, Study Finds
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960277

Oct 5th, 2021 - The tipping point for Dr. Paula Braveman came when a longtime patient of hers at a community clinic in San Francisco's Mission District slipped past the front desk and knocked on her office door to say goodbye. He wouldn't be coming to the clinic anymore, he told her, because he could no longer afford it. Dr. Paula Braveman It was a decisive moment for Braveman, who decided she wanted not only ...

Frustrated and Tired? Our Tolerance in Medicine
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960312

Oct 5th, 2021 - There is a narrative being pushed now about health care professionals being "frustrated" and "tired" in the midst of this current delta COVID wave. This stems from the idea that this current wave was potentially preventable if everyone received the COVID vaccines when they were made available. I certainly understand this frustration and am tired of dealing with COVID restrictions and wearing ma...

Artificial Sweetener Ups Appetite in Women, People With Obesity
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960250

Oct 5th, 2021 - A new study suggests that replacing sugar (sucrose) with the nonnutritive sweetener sucralose may not have the desired weight-loss effect, and in fact, it appears to increase appetite in women and people with obesity. These are novel insights and further studies are needed, experts say. After consuming a drink sweetened with sucralose versus sucrose, women and people with obesity had increased ...

Primary Goal in T2D Should Be Weight Loss, Diabetologists Say
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960302

Oct 5th, 2021 - Weight loss of at least 15% of body weight should become the "initial principal treatment goal" for many patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a new review and proposal published by an international quartet of diabetologists. Although this proposition currently has formal backing from just the four authors of the article published in the Lancet, their recommendation to elevate substantial...

Oct 1, 2021 This Week in Cardiology Podcast
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960027

Oct 1st, 2021 - Please note that the text below is not a full transcript and has not been copyedited. For more insight and commentary on these stories, subscribe to the This Week in Cardiology podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your preferred podcast provider. In This Week’s Podcast For the week ending October 1, 2021, John Mandrola, MD comments on the following news and features stories. CAC and Exercise ...

Low Back Pain: What Works? What Doesn't?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/959875

Sep 30th, 2021 - To focus on issues of pain management in primary care, this month I'm presenting a clinical scenario drawn from my own practice. I'll tell you what I plan to do, but I'm most interested in crowdsourcing a response from all of you to collectively determine best practice. So please answer the polling question and contribute your thoughts in the comments, whether you agree or disagree. Henry is a ...

More Severe Psoriasis Linked to an Increased Risk of PsA
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960038

Sep 30th, 2021 - The risk of developing psoriatic arthritis (PsA) may increase as the severity of psoriasis increases, results from a large analysis of U.S. medical records demonstrated. Factors that predict the development of psoriasis in patients with psoriasis include nail, inverse, and scalp psoriasis; family history of PsA; as well as severity of skin disease. And like psoriasis, "PsA is associated with a ...

Drug Cocktail Significantly Reduced Severe COVID, Death in Outpatients
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960060

Sep 30th, 2021 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. A monoclonal antibody combination of casirivimab and imdevimab (REGEN-COV) significantly reduced the risk of COVID-19–related hospitalizations and death from any cause in the phase 3 portion of an adaptive trial of outpatients. Researchers, led by David Weinreich, MD, MBA, executive vice preside...

Inactive Lifestyles Lead to More Frequent, Severe Hot Flashes: Study
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960078

Sep 30th, 2021 - In the age of COVID-19, it's super easy to find yourself sitting or lying down for a good chunk of the day, also known as sedentary behavior. Working from home, traveling less, and opting for DoorDash and Hulu over a date night at your favorite restaurant all keep us inside the house, sometimes with limited space. Not getting enough movement can damage your health and cause many preventable hea...