×
About 24,755 results

Baby Formula Shortage Highlights Racial Disparities
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974731

May 27th, 2022 - COLUMBIA, Md. (AP) — Capri Isidoro broke down in tears in the office of a lactation consultant. The mother of two had been struggling to breastfeed her 1-month-old daughter ever since she was born, when the hospital gave the baby formula first without consulting her on her desire to breastfeed. Now, with massive safety recall and supply disruptions causing formula shortages across the United St...

'It's an Amazing Time to Be a Hemophilia Provider'
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974738

May 27th, 2022 - New medications such as emicizumab (Hemlibra) are transforming the lives of patients with hemophilia A, and more treatments are in the pipeline. "It's an amazing time to be a hemophilia provider," Alice D. Ma, MD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill hematologist and bleeding disorder specialist, said in an interview. "There are real options, and it's very exciting." But the drugs come w...

After Texas School Shooting, Parents Search for New Answers
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974753

May 27th, 2022 - Amy Chambers is planning a visit soon with the principal of her son's elementary school in Joplin, MO. The grade level of the 19 children killed in the Tuesday school shooting in Uvalde, TX, was not unnoticed by her. Her son, the youngest of her three, is also a fourth grader. Chambers, a church secretary in Joplin, thinks the security to get into her son's school is good, but she has questions...

Update on Rabies, TBE, and Cholera Vaccines Before Travel
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974443

May 27th, 2022 - Healthcare providers should be aware of important updates to vaccine recommendations that could affect patients preparing to travel internationally this summer. This includes information about: New rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis guidelines (PrEP); The new tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccine; and Updated cholera vaccine recommendations and a restart of Vaxchora manufacturing and distribution....

Don't Equate Mass Shootings With Mental Illness
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974716

May 27th, 2022 - Here we go, again, and again, and again. There just aren't enough tears, and before the bodies of 19 small children are identified, the political noise starts up. Mass shootings are a part of the American landscape, but when they happen at schools, we all feel a distinct sense of violation and gaping grief. Those children are so innocent, so deserving of a right to live their lives, hold their ...

Bullying of People With Hidden Disabilities Leads to Misery and Fear
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974286

May 26th, 2022 - Bullying of disabled people is extensive. According to a Columbia University study, 1 in 3 disabled children globally have experienced violence. It is not only children who are the target of bullying; bias against disabled adults is also common. In my almost 30 years of treating people with disabilities, I have seen the immense emotional and physical toll that bullying and discrimination have o...

Frustrated With Delays, Doctors Take Aim at Prior Authorization
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974660

May 26th, 2022 - Last December, a young patient was admitted to Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, after several medications had failed to quell the child's relentless seizures. A hospital pediatrician, Vignesh Doraiswamy, consulted with neurologists and then tried a different drug. The child had fewer seizures, became more interactive, and was ready to go back home, says Doraiswamy. But there wa...

Texas School Killing, Deadliest in a Decade, Prompts Biden Call for Action
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974578

May 26th, 2022 - UVALDE, Texas (Reuters) - The murder of 19 children and two teachers at a South Texas elementary school has prompted a call to action from U.S. President Joe Biden, who urged Americans to confront the country's gun lobby and pressure Congress to tighten gun laws. In the deadliest school shooting in nearly a decade, Salvador Ramos, 18, began his rampage on Tuesday when he shot his grandmother, t...

As Hunger Spreads in Somalia, Babies Start to Die
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974584

May 26th, 2022 - DOLLOW, Somalia (Reuters) - Hacked-off thorn branches encircle two mounds of earth heaped over the tiny bodies of Halima Hassan Abdullahi's twin granddaughters. Babies Ebla and Abdia lived only a day. Weakened by hunger, their mother gave birth to the twins a month early, eight weeks after their exhausted family walked into a camp for displaced families in the Somali town of Dollow. "She is mal...

Video Game Addiction: Definitions, Best Treatments Remain Elusive
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974683

May 26th, 2022 - NEW ORLEANS – Research into video game addiction is turning up new insights, and some treatments seem to make a difference, according to addiction psychiatry experts speaking at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. Still, understanding remains limited amid a general lack of clarity about definitions, measurements, and the most effective treatment strategies. "Video games ...

Metaverse: Where Are the Medical Ethics?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/973273

May 26th, 2022 - This transcript has been edited for clarity. Hi. I'm Art Caplan, and I'm at the Division of Medical Ethics at New York University's Grossman School of Medicine. Some of you know that Mark Zuckerberg has spun out a bigger entity of his Facebook company called Meta; what he's talking about is a company that's going to try to create an artificial world using the internet in the future — the so-cal...

Airway Injuries 'Devastating' After Battery Ingestions
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974712

May 26th, 2022 - Severe airway injuries are a "not infrequent" consequence after children swallow button batteries, which are commonly found in many household electronics, according to a systematic review published online in JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery. Most literature has focused on esophageal injury, but "the direct apposition of the esophagus to the trachea and recurrent laryngeal nerves also pla...

It Took 35 Years to Get a Malaria Vaccine. Why?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974622

May 25th, 2022 - When the World Health Organization approved a malaria vaccine for the first time in October 2021, it was widely hailed as a milestone. "This is a historic moment," said WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in a statement that month. The vaccine — dubbed RTS,S — promises a 30 percent reduction in severe malaria in fully vaccinated children. In 2020, a research team estimated that each...

Childhood Survivors of Gun Violence: What's the Long-term Outlook?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974637

May 25th, 2022 - As the parents of the 19 children shot dead Tuesday in Uvalde, Texas, by a teen gunman grapple with unspeakable grief and funeral preparations, the survivors and their families are dealing with their own angst, and likely much more. While the parents understandably feel lucky that their children made it out, what about the long-term effect on their children of witnessing that carnage, of seeing...

Blood Lead Testing Has Not Bounced Back From Pandemic Dip, Chicago Study Suggests
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974589

May 25th, 2022 - Childhood blood lead testing in Chicago fell drastically during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic and has yet to recover, research suggests. Testing rates fell by a third in the period March 2020 through September 2020 compared with the same calendar months from 2017 to 2019. Although 2021 testing rates showed some improvement, they were still significantly below pre-pandemic levels. Th...

Texas Killings Leave Nation's Doctors Grieving, Seething
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974615

May 25th, 2022 - Editor's note: This story has been updated to include additional comments. As details emerge about yet another mass killing of children, America's physicians have reacted with a mix of outrage, grief, and frustration to the murders. On Tuesday, an 18-year-old gunman shot and killed 19 children and two teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, a town of about 15,000 people almost 80 m...

Children and Families Often Don't Know When Inhalers Are Empty
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974423

May 24th, 2022 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Most children and their families don't know when their metered dose inhalers (MDIs) are empty or how to properly dispose of them, researchers found. "The crucial disadvantage of the MDIs is the inability to identify the amount of medications left in the inhalers. This is due to the design of MDIs which contain a propellent along with the active drug to expel the labe...

More First-degree Relatives Develop Celiac Disease Than Expected
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974500

May 24th, 2022 - Children who have first-degree relatives with celiac disease (CD) may be at higher risk of developing CD before age 10 than previously thought, according to results of an analysis of 10-year follow-up data. This analysis also yielded a web-based prediction model to help with screening for CD in children. Screening is recommended for children who have a first-degree relative with celiac disease ...

Protease Inhibitor–Based DAAs Appear Safe in Decompensated Patients
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974504

May 24th, 2022 - SAN DIEGO – An analysis of a large, international cohort suggests that treatment with protease-inhibitor (PI)–based direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) may be safe for patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) with cirrhosis and early-stage liver decompensation. The study relied on data from the REAL-C registry, including 935 patients treated with oral DAAs at 27 centers in the U.S., Europe, and Asia P...

Food Allergy Risk Not Greater in C-Section Infants
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974519

May 24th, 2022 - Cesarean births are not likely linked to an elevated risk of food allergy during the first year of life, an Australian study found. Published online in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, the findings may help assess the risks and benefits of cesarean delivery and reassure women who require it that their babies are not more likely to develop food allergy, according to Rachel L. Pete...