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About 7,880 results

Murder of Physician Raises the Stress Level for All Clinicians
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975860

Jun 30th, 2022 - Physician stress — indeed, the stress level for all medical personnel — has reached new heights. As if it weren't enough that doctors work in a profession where it's almost more a question of when they'll be sued than if they'll be sued — where COVID, staff shortages and long hours, and patients frustrated over canceled procedures have caused unrelenting fatigue and stress — they now have to wo...

Children With Migraine at High Risk of Comorbid Anxiety, Depression
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/976385

Jun 29th, 2022 - Children and adolescents with migraine are about twice as likely to have an anxiety or depressive disorder as those without migraine, results from a new review and meta-analysis suggest. Dr Serena Orr "This is compelling, high-level evidence showing there's this established comorbidity between migraine and anxiety and depressive symptoms and disorders in this age group," co-investigator Serena ...

Pandemic Stress Tied to Increased Headache Burden in Teens
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/976281

Jun 27th, 2022 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. Contrary to previous research findings, the stress of the COVID-19 pandemic has been linked to an increased headache burden in teens. Investigators found factors contributing to headache for preteens and teens during the pandemic included increased screen time for online learning, depression, an...

Another Public Health Crisis Originating From Gun Violence
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/976178

Jun 27th, 2022 - The number of mass shootings in the US has jumped from 272 annually in 2014 to 692 annually in 2021. As these attacks have increased in frequency, averaging more than once daily since 2019, we've slowly become accustomed to their occurrence. Now, guns only reenter the national conversation when there is a particularly devastating event. Most recently, a shooting in an elementary school in Uvald...

Why It's So Hard to Prevent Physician Suicide
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/976146

Jun 24th, 2022 - Kip Wenger, DO, an emergency physician and systems medical director of Team Health, in Knoxville, Tennessee, was asked to see a patient in the emergency department (ED). He was shocked when he realized who the patient was — a 33-year-old female physician friend and colleague. She was bleeding from multiple self-inflicted injuries and ultimately died. "I was devastated and couldn't wrap my head ...

Hypervigilance and Helplessness in Facing Death of a Patient
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/976074

Jun 24th, 2022 - It's an early Friday morning during the pandemic. I arrive at my clinic to find my 8 o'clock slot booked with a same-day patient. As a clinical psychologist embedded within a primary care team, I meet with patients at varying frequency. I had just met with this patient on Monday — twice in one week was unexpected. Earlier in the week, she had been her typical steady self: An experienced, emotio...

Marathons Aren't Madness, They're Mindfulness for Me
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975974

Jun 23rd, 2022 - I often get asked how I have time for marathon training while doing residency training or why I want to fill my free time with running up to 20 miles at a time. For me, running and racing has been a way to cope with the demands of residency. Running is like a free hour of therapy for me. Sometimes, my mind is a blank slate, but other times, my racing thoughts seem to calm themselves by the end ...

How Can Teleworkers Stay Mentally and Physically Healthy?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975902

Jun 20th, 2022 - MADRID — The COVID pandemic has had countless consequences. One of the most significant can be seen in any number of companies: the introduction of the telework model into work routines. There has been such a clear push toward this way of working that it's quite likely that employees will regularly carry out their tasks from home in the future. This topic was brought to light at the 1st Interna...

What's the Best Time of Day to Exercise? It Depends on Your Goals
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975915

Jun 20th, 2022 - For most of us, the "best" time of day to work out is simple: When we can. Maybe that's before or after work. Or when the gym offers free daycare. Or when our favorite instructor teaches our favorite class. That's why we call it a "routine." And if the results are the same, it's hard to imagine changing it up. But what if the results aren't the same? They may not be, according to a new study fr...

It's Hot Outside -- and That's Bad News for Children's Health
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975798

Jun 17th, 2022 - AUSTIN, Texas — Heat waves are getting hotter and becoming more frequent because of rising rates of air pollution, putting children's health at risk, a wide-ranging new report finds. A June 15 article in the New England Journal of Medicine reviews current research to take a sweeping inventory of how air pollution and climate change interact to adversely affect people's health, especially that o...

A Personalized Approach to Managing Migraine With Complementary and Integrative Medicine
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/973871

Jun 17th, 2022 - This transcript has been edited for clarity. Anna Pace, MD: Hi, everyone, and welcome. My name is Dr Anna Pace. I'm an assistant professor of neurology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and I direct the Headache Medicine Fellowship at Mount Sinai Hospital. Today, I'm lucky enough to be joined by my illustrious colleague, Dr Zhang. Dr Zhang, would you like to introduce yourself? Ni...

COVID-19 Pandemic Stress Affected Ovulation, Not Menstruation
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975833

Jun 17th, 2022 - Disturbances in ovulation that didn't produce any actual changes in the menstrual cycle of women were extremely common during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic and were linked to emotional stress, according to the findings of an "experiment of nature" that allowed for comparison with women a decade earlier. Findings from two studies of reproductive-age women, one conducted in 2006-2008 an...

COVID-Induced Anxiety in Physicians: How Did I Cope?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975498

Jun 16th, 2022 - When the pandemic hit the world, I was working as a psychiatry consultant in a hospital. With the lockdown, much of the hospital seemed deserted. In the doctor's parking lot, where it was normally hard to find a spot, only a few cars were parked. Once busy corridors were nearly empty. So was the doctors' lounge. As I walked inside the hospital, I had a feeling of anxiety, a sense of doom. Colle...

Fertility Treatment May Boost Migraine Frequency
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975729

Jun 16th, 2022 - Fertility treatment in women with migraine is linked to an increase in headache frequency, new research suggests. Preliminary results from a prospective cohort study showed participants with a history of migraine had an increased number of headaches vs their counterparts without migraine while undergoing fertility treatment. The findings underscore the importance of identifying and monitoring t...

Persistent Abdominal Pain: Not Always IBS
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975785

Jun 16th, 2022 - Persistent abdominal pain may be caused by a whole range of different conditions, say French experts who call for more physician awareness to achieve early diagnosis and treatment so as to improve patient outcomes. Benoit Coffin, MD, PhD, and Henri Duboc, MD, PhD, from Hôpital Louis Mourier, Colombes, France, conducted a literature review to identify rare and less well-known causes of persisten...

Growing Up in Unsafe Neighborhoods Tied to Poor Sleep in Adults
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975669

Jun 15th, 2022 - Growing up in neighborhoods perceived as unsafe is linked to disordered sleep in adulthood, in new findings that suggest improving neighborhood safety can have long-term benefits on sleep quality. "Our study expands upon previous findings by demonstrating a possible link between neighborhood environments in childhood and sleep health during adulthood," lead author Symielle Gaston, PhD, MPH, res...

As Medical Trainees’ Mental Health Suffers, AMA to Collect Data on Wellness Programs
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975633

Jun 15th, 2022 - Medical students, residents, and fellows report higher rates of burnout, depression and anxiety than the general population, putting them at higher risk for suicide.  Wellness initiatives at medical institutions can help combat this, and the American Medical Association (AMA) said Monday at the annual meeting of its House of Delegates it will commit to developing a standardized way to collect i...

Snoring Can Lead to a Sedentary Lifestyle
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975661

Jun 15th, 2022 - People who snore frequently, even those who don't have sleep apnea, may be less physically active during the day, new research shows. "People who snore are also likely to have sleep apnea, but those who snore and don't have sleep apnea are a largely understudied group," senior author Michael Grandner, PhD, told Medscape Medical News. "We found that even just snoring alone can impact health and ...

Triptans in Pregnancy and ADHD in Kids: New Reassuring Data
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975526

Jun 14th, 2022 - Triptan use during pregnancy does not increase the risk for attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in offspring, new research suggests. Hedvig Nordeng, PhD "The findings should reassure women who need to take this class of drugs during pregnancy," study author Hedvig Nordeng, PhD, professor and head of the Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Research Group at the University of Oslo, ...

Sleep a Neglected Pillar of Health, National Survey Shows
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/975358

Jun 10th, 2022 - Physicians and patients agree on the importance of sleep for health, yet few clinicians obtain a patient sleep history, and few patients discuss their sleep problems with healthcare providers, a new national survey shows. "Everybody thinks that sleep should be a pillar of health, but there is a big communication gap between patients and healthcare providers that may keep patients with insomnia ...