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About 46,443 results

Highly Processed Foods 'as Addictive' as Tobacco
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984600

Nov 25th, 2022 - LONDON — Highly processed foods meet the same criteria as tobacco for addiction, and labeling them as such might benefit public health, according to a new US study that proposes a set of criteria to assess the addictive potential of some foods. The research suggests that healthcare professionals are taking steps towards framing food addiction as a clinical entity in its own right; it currently ...

Study Finds Chronic Jet Lag-like Body Clocks in People With HIV
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984586

Nov 24th, 2022 - People living with HIV (PLWH) had a "mistimed circadian phase" and a shorter night's sleep compared with HIV-negative individuals with a similar lifestyle, according to findings that suggest both a possible mechanism for increased comorbidities in PLWH and potential solutions. "It is very well known that sleep problems are common in people living with HIV, and many different reasons for this ha...

US STOCKS-Retailer, energy boost helps Wall Street rally
https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-stocks/us-stocks-retailer-energy-boost-helps-wall-street-rally-idUSL1N32I26F

Nov 22nd, 2022 - (For a Reuters live blog on U.S., UK and European stock markets, click or type LIVE/ in a news window.) Best Buy up, sees smaller annual sales drop Dollar Tree drops on lower FY profit forecast Manchester United surges on sale report (Updates to market close) NEW YORK, Nov 22 (Reuters) - U.S. stocks rallied on Tuesday in light trading volume as a sales forecast by Best Buy dampened concerns hig...

Opt-out HIV Testing in Emergency Rooms Can Help Identify Undiagnosed Cases
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984473

Nov 22nd, 2022 - Results of a new study indicate that opt-out HIV testing, in particular "notional consent testing" where a patient is not asked or counseled before conducting the test, is an effective tool for identifying undiagnosed HIV cases in populations with an HIV positivity rate greater than 0.2%. On implementation of opt-out testing of patients aged 18-59 admitted to the emergency room at St. George's ...

Should Women Attempt Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Delivery?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984450

Nov 22nd, 2022 - Rates of cesarean delivery are rising globally. They now account for more than 30% of births in the United States. As a result, more women than ever face the decision of whether they should attempt a vaginal delivery after having undergone a cesarean (VBAC) or choose an elective repeat cesarean (ERCS). The results of a new study could help them make a more informed choice. Researchers in the Un...

20% of Patients With Diabetes in Drug-Free Remission With Low-Carb Program
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984374

Nov 21st, 2022 - LONDON — Remission of type 2 diabetes so that glucose-lowering medication is no longer needed has been achieved in around 20% of patients using a low-carbohydrate diet at a general practice in Northern England, indicate new data presented at the Diabetes Professional Care 2022 conference. David Unwin, MD, a primary care doctor at Norwood Surgery, Southport, UK, saw his 125th patient with type 2...

Over 4000 Zimbabwean Doctors and Nurses Left the Country in 2021
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984363

Nov 21st, 2022 - HARARE (Reuters) - Zimbabwean health workers have left the country in droves over the past year, a senior official at the Health Services Board (HSB) revealed on Sunday. More than 4,000 health workers have left since 2021, HSB chairperson Dr Paulinus Sikosana told Reuters. This includes more than 1,700 registered nurses who resigned last year and more than 900 who left this year. Health workers...

Banned Blood Donors Welcomed Again as Mad Cow Disease Concerns Fade
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984414

Nov 21st, 2022 - Organizations like the American Red Cross and others are stepping up efforts to recruit previously banned blood donors after the FDA lifted its restrictions on people who had been overseas amid outbreaks of mad cow disease. "This eligibility change will potentially impact hundreds of thousands of individuals who were previously ineligible to give blood or platelets, including many in the milita...

Most Global Bacterial Deaths in 2019 Linked to Five Pathogens
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984426

Nov 21st, 2022 - In what may be the first estimate of bacterial deaths worldwide, researchers reported 33 bacterial pathogens were responsible for more than 1 in 7 deaths in 2019, with five pathogens linked to slightly more than half of those deaths. "Deaths associated with these bacteria would rank as the second leading cause of death globally in 2019," behind ischemic heart disease, write senior investigator ...

Higher Risk for Seizures After COVID vs Influenza
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984325

Nov 18th, 2022 - Individuals who have had COVID-19 are more likely to develop seizures or epilepsy after being infected than their peers who have had influenza, new research suggests. In an analysis of more than 300,000 individuals, those who had COVID were 66% more likely than those with influenza to develop epilepsy or seizures during the 6 months after infection. The risk was highest in children and in those...

Hospital Patient Safety Improves; Physician Burnout Is Bad in Developed Nations; and Managing Opioid Prescriptions
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984205

Nov 18th, 2022 - Hospital Patient Safety Improves Hospital patient safety improved in the past decade, saving thousands of lives, a new report finds. Improvements in five measures of safety resulted in an estimated 16,000 lives saved over 10 years, according to the 10th annual report by the Leapfrog Group, a nonprofit healthcare safety and quality organization. Incidents of falls and trauma and of objects unint...

Survey Finds Global MD Burnout Compromising Patient Care
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984210

Nov 17th, 2022 - Primary care physicians in 10 developed countries say their burnout is severe and could compromise the quality of care they provide patients, a new survey found. But the findings hold a sliver of good news for clinicians in the United States: Burnout here may not be as bad as it is for their colleagues in many other nations. The survey, from the Commonwealth Fund, a foundation promoting high-qu...

Study Affirms Shorter Regimens for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984228

Nov 17th, 2022 - UPDATED November 18, 2022 // Editor's note: This article has been updated with additional comments. Two short-course bedaquiline-containing treatment regimens for rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (TB) showed "robust evidence" for superior efficacy and less ototoxicity compared to a 9-month injectable control regimen, researchers report. The findings validate the World Health Organization's (WH...

Blood Test Signals BRCA  Breast Cancer 2 Years Before Diagnosis
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984230

Nov 17th, 2022 - Editor’s note: The first few paragraphs of this article have been expanded to explain the study methodology more clearly, after a reader commented that it was confusing. BARCELONA — A new blood test developed by Dutch researchers can identify changes in serum proteins that signal the onset of breast cancer up to 2 years before diagnosis of the disease in women who are at high risk. The findings...

Big Pharma Not Doing Enough to Improve Drug Access: Analysis
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984130

Nov 16th, 2022 - LONDON (Reuters) - Since the pandemic emerged, more top drugmakers have made progress in improving access to medicines in the developing world, but those gains are largely limited to middle-income countries leaving the poorest behind, an analysis has found. The report, published by the non-profit Access to Medicine Foundation every two years, found that companies are employing strategies includ...

Analysis Affirms Giving Birth Protects Against Endometrial Cancer
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984164

Nov 16th, 2022 - An epidemiological analysis using genetic data shows that having babies protects women from endometrial cancer. Compared with having no children, the risk reduction for endometrial cancer was 21% with having one child, 38% with having two, and 51% with having three, Gunn-Helen Moen, MSc, PhD, a research fellow at the University of Queensland Institute for Molecular Bioscience in St. Lucia, Aust...

Eggs Rationing at Some British Supermarkets as Avian Flu Hits Supply
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984134

Nov 16th, 2022 - LONDON (Reuters) - Some British supermarkets have started to ration customers' purchase of eggs after supplies were disrupted by avian flu. Britain is facing its largest-ever outbreak of bird flu and is seeing rapid escalation in the number of cases on commercial farms, impacting eggs supply and also raising fears of a shortage of turkeys and chickens for the Christmas table. Asda, Britain's th...

Night Lights in the City Link to Increased Risk of Diabetes
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984056

Nov 15th, 2022 - Higher levels of exposure to outdoor artificial light at night are significantly linked with markers of diabetes and impaired glucose homeostasis, in a new national, cross-sectional study from China. The results showed a 7% significant increase in diabetes prevalence per quintile exposure to artificial light at night (prevalence ratio [PR], 1.07), report Ruizhi Zheng, PhD, of the Shanghai Jiaot...

IRONMAN Galvanizes Case for IV Iron Repletion in Heart Failure
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/984030

Nov 14th, 2022 - Another major study appears to back the use of intravenous iron repletion in patients with heart failure (HF) and iron deficiency, strengthening largely consistent evidence, researchers say, that the treatment may improve symptoms and prevent some HF-related hospital admissions. To be sure, the IRONMAN trial, which compared IV iron vs usual care in such patients — most with reduced ejection fra...

CTD-ILD: Rituximab 'a Reasonable Alternative to Cyclophosphamide'
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/983976

Nov 13th, 2022 - PHILADELPHIA — In the first controlled clinical trial to compare the two drugs, rituximab and cyclophosphamide were similarly effective in improving lung function in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) associated with idiopathic inflammatory myositis and mixed connective tissue disease (CTD). The findings also revealed some nuanced findings that could help clarify which drug to use in...