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Does taking isotretinoin worsen a patient’s baseline IBD symptoms?
https://www.mdedge.com/dermatology/article/255034/acne/does-taking-isotretinoin-worsen-patients-baseline-ibd-symptoms
Doug Brunk

May 27th, 2022 - A limited association exists between the use of isotretinoin for severe acne and worsening of a patient’s baseline inflammatory bowel disease, results from a small retrospective study suggests. “Early studies of isotretinoin for use in severe acne suggested the drug may serve as a trigger for new-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD),” researchers led by Christina G.

Update on Rabies, TBE, and Cholera Vaccines Before Travel
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974443

May 27th, 2022 - Healthcare providers should be aware of important updates to vaccine recommendations that could affect patients preparing to travel internationally this summer. This includes information about: New rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis guidelines (PrEP); The new tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccine; and Updated cholera vaccine recommendations and a restart of Vaxchora manufacturing and distribution....

Baby Formula Shortage Highlights Racial Disparities
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974731

May 27th, 2022 - COLUMBIA, Md. (AP) — Capri Isidoro broke down in tears in the office of a lactation consultant. The mother of two had been struggling to breastfeed her 1-month-old daughter ever since she was born, when the hospital gave the baby formula first without consulting her on her desire to breastfeed. Now, with massive safety recall and supply disruptions causing formula shortages across the United St...

Study Addresses Whether Isotretinoin Precipitates IBD Flares
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974735

May 27th, 2022 - A limited association exists between the use of isotretinoin for severe acne and worsening of a patient's baseline inflammatory bowel disease, results from a small retrospective study suggests. "Early studies of isotretinoin for use in severe acne suggested the drug may serve as a trigger for new-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)," researchers led by Christina G. Lopez, MD, of the Lewis Ka...

Betting on 'Golden Age' of Colonoscopies, Private Equity Invests in Gastro Docs
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974747

May 27th, 2022 - Mariel needed a new gastroenterologist. Having just moved back to San Antonio, the 30-something searched for a doctor to manage her Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel condition that is successfully managed with medications and lifelong monitoring — including regular colonoscopies. Mariel booked an appointment and learned she would be on the hook for a $1,100 colonoscopy — about three times ...

FDA Okays IN.PACT 018 Drug-Coated Balloon for PAD
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974732

May 27th, 2022 - The US Food and Drug Administration has approved the IN.PACT 018 drug-coated balloon (DCB) for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, Medtronic announced today. The paclitaxel-coated balloon is indicated for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of de novo, restenotic, or in-stent restenotic lesions up to 360 mm in length with vessel diameters of 4 to 7 mm, located in the superficial fem...

'It's an Amazing Time to Be a Hemophilia Provider'
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974738

May 27th, 2022 - New medications such as emicizumab (Hemlibra) are transforming the lives of patients with hemophilia A, and more treatments are in the pipeline. "It's an amazing time to be a hemophilia provider," Alice D. Ma, MD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill hematologist and bleeding disorder specialist, said in an interview. "There are real options, and it's very exciting." But the drugs come w...

Nutrients and Exercise Affect Tumor Development
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974751

May 27th, 2022 - MADRID, Spain — Researchers discussed an update on the latest evidence regarding the cancer-lifestyle link as part of the Precision Health session: Oncology, held during the 7th International Congress of the Spanish Society of Precision Health (SESAP). The role that certain nutrients can have on tumor development was analyzed, along with the most recent data justifying the idea that the prescri...

'Unlimited' Cancer Costs: The Medicare Part D Dilemma
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974754

May 27th, 2022 - Learning that a family member has cancer can be devastating enough. Waiting to find out whether a loved one can afford their treatment takes the concern to another level. That was the case for health policy expert Stacie B. Dusetzina, PhD, when her mother was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. "There is this period where you are waiting to learn more about the cancer type and treatment op...

Number of US Monkeypox Cases Grows to 10, CDC Says
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974772

May 27th, 2022 - Ten monkeypox cases have been identified in eight states, according to the CDC. The CDC website said that as of 5 p.m. Thursday, health officials had identified two cases in Florida, two cases in Utah, and one case each in California, Colorado, Massachusetts, New York, Virginia, and Washington state. CDC Director Rochelle Walensky, MD, said Thursday that most of the cases "are within gay [and] ...

Double the Pleasure: Stim Patch Delays Early Ejaculation: Study
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974773

May 27th, 2022 - A wearable patch that delivers electrical stimulation to the perineum may postpone premature ejaculation, according to research presented at the 2022 annual meeting of the American Urological Association. The disposable device appears to work by helping men contract the muscles in the pelvic floor, allowing them to postpone climax. Among 34 men with a lifelong history of premature ejaculation, ...

Eosinophilic Diseases Often Overlap, Raising Costs
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974781

May 27th, 2022 - Eosinophilic GI diseases (EGIDs) often overlap with other eosinophil-associated diseases (EADs), which leads to greater health care costs, according to an analysis of the U.S. Optum Clinformatics claims database. EADs have gained increased attention in recent years. They include eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), eosinophilic asthma, bullous pemphigoid, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiiti...

The Next US Abortion Battle Is Over Pills, and It's Already Begun
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974646

May 27th, 2022 - WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court has not yet released its decision that looks set to dramatically scale back abortion rights, but one of the next legal battles has already begun in a Mississippi court. That is where the manufacturer of a pill used to carry out medication abortions, Las Vegas-based GenBioPro Inc, has filed a federal lawsuit challenging the conservative state's restr...

Early Liver Transplant Outcomes Not Impacted by New US Allocation System
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974702

May 27th, 2022 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A new system for allocating liver allografts in the United States, implemented in 2020, has been associated with procurement-related delays but has had no adverse impact on early transplant outcomes, a new study shows. To assess the effect of Liver Acuity Circle Allocation (AC), researchers compared data from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) o...

Elderly Still Make Up Most of the COVID-19 Deaths
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974719

May 27th, 2022 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. The number of daily COVID-19 deaths is dropping in the United States, but one fact has not changed in two-plus years of the pandemic: The elderly are still most at risk of dying from the virus. The seven-day moving average of COVID-related deaths is now 288, a number far lower than the peaks of ...

Disparities Exist in Diabetes-Related ED Visits
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974720

May 27th, 2022 - Wide disparities exist in diabetes-related emergency department (ED) use between racial and ethnic groups, rural and urban patients, and Medicare and Medicaid-insured adults versus those who were privately insured between 2008 and 2017, a serial cross-sectional study indicates. All-cause ED visits increased by over 50% during the same period even though substantial health reforms were made duri...

Previous COVID-19 or MIS-C does not protect kids from Omicron
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/954167

May 27th, 2022 - Research drawing on the national Overcoming COVID-19 study, led by Boston Children’s Hospital, and the hospital’s own Taking On COVID-19 Together Group provides evidence that children who previously had COVID-19 (or the inflammatory condition MIS-C) are not protected against the newer Omicron variant. Vaccination, however, does afford protection, the study found. The findings, published in Natu...

Follow-up data further support the superior efficacy of cabozantinib in patients with progressive differentiated thyroid cancer
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/954173

May 27th, 2022 - The most common subtype of thyroid cancer is differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which has a good prognosis and a survival rate of over 85%. The initial treatment approach is surgery followed, in some cases, by adjuvant radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. A subset of patients develop RAI-refractory progressive disease, and, until the advent of multikinase inhibitors, lenvatinib and sorafenib, tr...

ECOG-ACRIN research highlights at ASCO 2022
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/954124

May 27th, 2022 - Philadelphia, May 27, 2022—Researchers with the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group (ECOG-ACRIN) will present a wide range of study results at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago and online June 3-7. The data include evaluations of new approaches to cancer treatment, control, care delivery, and health equity. The National Cancer Institute, part of the Na...

Study reveals potential target for treatment of diseases associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/954172

May 27th, 2022 - A study by Brazilian scientists points to the probable biological mechanism that modulates the accumulation of mutant mitochondrial DNA in cells during aging, especially in the liver. The mechanism is called autophagy, a process of cellular cleansing that destroys organelles, including mitochondria, and recycles their components. The findings resolve a paradigm in the field and raise a hypothes...