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About 1,128,270 results

US Census Bureau: Big City Losses Early in COVID Pandemic
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974692

May 26th, 2022 - Ko Im always thought she would live in New York forever. She knew every corner of Manhattan and had worked hard to build a community of friends. Living in a small apartment, she found her attitude shifting early in the coronavirus pandemic. After her brother accepted a job in Seattle in the summer of 2020, she decided to move there too. "It was fine until it wasn't," Im, 36, said of her time in...

Nurses Are Waiting Months to Get a License Despite Staffing Shortages
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974691

May 26th, 2022 - Even before Christopher Battelli graduated from the University of Colorado College of Nursing in December, he had a job lined up at Stanford University Medical Center and had applied for a California nursing license. Battelli's job at Stanford was scheduled to begin March 1. "I sent them my transcripts about four times. But electronic transcripts expire in 30 days, and no one was pulling them. ...

Does Viagra Reduce Mortality in Pulmonary Fibrosis?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974695

May 26th, 2022 - Sildenafil (Viagra, Pfizer), a phosphodieterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor and a pulmonary-selective vasodilator, may reduce mortality in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), compared with placebo or standard of care but it does not reduce hospitalizations or acute exacerbations from the disorder, a small meta-analysis suggests. "There have only been four trials investigating sildenafil ...

Clinical Trial Upgrades Will Open Care Up to More People
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974693

May 26th, 2022 - Trishna Bharadia has multiple sclerosis and works as a patient engagement consultant and is often asked to participate in clinical trials. Mostly, though, she turns them down. She has to; a resident of rural England, Bharadia lives hours away from most clinical trial sites. Even if one were closer, the medical care typically requires time off work, which is hard for her to get. Bharadia partici...

EULAR Congress Opens New Avenues for Learning, Collaborating
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974694

May 26th, 2022 - After 2 years of being online only, the scientific committee of the European Alliance of Associations for Rheumatology (EULAR) has worked hard to provide a program for the EULAR 2022 Annual Congress that provides the best experience for both in-person and virtual attendees. "Be aware that rheumatology research has not slept over the last 2 years," Hendrik Schulze-Koops, MD, PhD, program chair f...

Counterintuitive Effect of Sparring on the Brains of Mixed Martial Arts Fighters
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974698

May 26th, 2022 - Sparring among professional mixed martial arts (MMA) practitioners may have both positive and negative effects on the brain, early research suggests. Investigators found sparring, defined as strategically hitting opponents with kicks, punches, and other strikes during practice sessions, is linked to increased white matter hyperintensities in the brain, pointing to possible vascular damage from ...

Quick Pivot Helped Maintain Standard of Schizophrenia Care During COVID
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974711

May 26th, 2022 - During the COVID-19 pandemic, mental health clinics in the United States successfully upheld the standard of care for patients with schizophrenia using telepsychiatry and long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIs), a new survey data show. "Mental health centers rose to the challenge and did what they needed to do for their patients," study investigator Dawn Velligan, PhD, University of Texas ...

Monkeypox and HIV/AIDS: Paul Volberding, MD, on the Parallels
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974710

May 26th, 2022 - Monkeypox and HIV are strange bedfellows with a common thread — stigma — and what has quickly become an all too familiar target — men who have sex with men (MSM). In light of the rapidly evolving monkeypox outbreak, Medscape Medical News sat down with Paul Volberding, MD, professor emeritus at the University of California, San Francisco and one of veterans of the early days of the HIV/AIDS epid...

Takotsubo Syndrome More Deadly in Men
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974713

May 26th, 2022 - Takotsubo syndrome occurs much more frequently in women than it does in men, but men are much more likely to die from it, according to the results of a new study. In an analysis of almost 2,500 patients with Takotsubo syndrome (TSS) who were enrolled in an international registry, men, who made up just 11% of the sample, had significantly higher rates of cardiogenic shock and were more than twic...

Airway Injuries 'Devastating' After Battery Ingestions
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974712

May 26th, 2022 - Severe airway injuries are a "not infrequent" consequence after children swallow button batteries, which are commonly found in many household electronics, according to a systematic review published online in JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery. Most literature has focused on esophageal injury, but "the direct apposition of the esophagus to the trachea and recurrent laryngeal nerves also pla...

Are Docs Getting Fed Up With Hearing About Burnout?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974638

May 26th, 2022 - There is a feeling of exhaustion, being unable to shake a lingering cold, suffering from frequent headaches and gastrointestinal disturbances, sleeplessness and shortness of breath… That was how burnout was described by clinical psychologist Herbert Freudenberger, PhD, who first used the phrase in a paper back in 1974, after observing the emotional depletion and accompanying psychosomatic sympt...

Approaching ASCO 2022: Collaborations in the Management of Bladder Cancer
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974643

May 26th, 2022 - In anticipation of the first in-person ASCO conference since the start of the COVID pandemic, Cheryl Lee, MD, considers several dimensions of the impending meeting, among them updates on novel therapies currently under investigation, and the opportunities such gatherings nurture regarding collaborations, both within the academy and extending outward into community-based organizations and indust...

Approaching ASCO 2022: Reaching New Plateaus in the Treatment of Melanoma
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974644

May 26th, 2022 - Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD, looks ahead to the upcoming ASCO conference, in which he anticipates a convergence of updates on previously published studies — studies that collectively produced a necessary "plateau" or consolidation of data and generated successive investigations that have, in turn, produced new elevations. Whether the topic is advances on neoadjuvant regimens, the latest data on s...

Very High HDL-C: Too Much of a Good Thing?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974651

May 26th, 2022 - A new study suggests that very high levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HCL-C) may be associated with higher mortality risk in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Investigators studied close to 10,000 patients with CAD in two separate cohorts. After adjusting for an array of covariates, they found that individuals with HDL-C levels greater than 80 mg/dL had a 96% higher ris...

Higher Bystander CPR Rates in States With High School Mandates
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974649

May 26th, 2022 - States that mandated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and automated external defibrillator (AED) education in high schools had higher rates of bystander CPR for an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest than those that did not, a retrospective cohort study suggests. Overall, the rate of bystander CPR after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was 40.7%, with a lower number of cardiac arrests receiving ...

Improving Cross-Cultural Communication Skills With Patients
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974645

May 26th, 2022 - INDIANAPOLIS ― With a focus on helping fellow practitioners improve their patient-care skills, members of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Commission of the American Academy of Physician Associates (AAPA) presented a wide-ranging session on cross-cultural communication at the group's 2022 annual meeting. Robert Lee Wooten Commission chair Robert Lee Wooten, PA-C, noted that cross-cult...

Glucocorticoid Abnormalities Boost Infections
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974650

May 26th, 2022 - Researchers published the study covered in this summary on medRxiv.org as a preprint that has not yet been peer reviewed. Key Takeaways The newly derived Infections in Patients With Endocrinopathies (ICARO) questionnaire is a patient self-report tool that showed promise in clinical testing as a simple and cost-effective way to identify patients at increased risk for infections and evaluate the ...

Twitter Promotion Boosts Visibility, Citation for CV Research
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974653

May 26th, 2022 - Promoting cardiovascular medicine articles on Twitter increases online visibility and citation rates, a new randomized study indicates. A study by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) found that actively tweeting cardiovascular articles in the @ESC_journals handle was associated with a 12% increase in the citation rate at a median follow-up of 2.7 years. The results confirm the "gut feeling...

Antipsychotic Safe, Effective for Resistant Depression in Phase 3 Trial
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974652

May 26th, 2022 - Cariprazine (Vraylar) is a safe and effective adjunctive treatment for adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) who have an inadequate response to antidepressant monotherapy, new results from a phase 3 study show. Already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat adults with schizophrenia and manic, mixed, or depressive episodes of bipolar I disorder, cariprazine is unde...

Air Pollution May Contribute to Severe COVID-19 Outcomes
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/974655

May 26th, 2022 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. Patients exposed to common air pollutants are at risk for more severe outcomes after they become infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, data suggest. In a prospective study of more than 150,000 patients with COVID-19, incremental increases in exposure to common pollutants were associated with incre...