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About 4,648 results

Negative Home COVID Test No 'Free Pass' for Kids, Study Finds
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966826

Jan 19th, 2022 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. With the country looking increasingly to rapid testing as an off-ramp from the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study shows that the performance of the tests in children falls below standards set by regulatory agencies in the United States and elsewhere for diagnostic accuracy. Experts said the findings...

Study: Lateral Flow Tests Performance Vary Broadly and Falls Short of WHO Criteria
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966835

Jan 19th, 2022 - The UK government recently asked all secondary schools to provide on-site COVID-19 testing for pupils, and advised secondary, college and university students to continue twice weekly testing, in an attempt to try and reduce transmission of COVID-19. However, researchers from University of Manchester have suggested that lateral flow test performance may be below par, falling short of the minimum...

Specialized Spectacles Slow Myopia During Lockdown
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966789

Jan 18th, 2022 - Specially designed spectacles can slow the progression of myopia, even during the lockdowns mandated by the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers say. Myopia progressed 46% more slowly in children prescribed defocus incorporated multiple segments (DIMS) lenses than in children prescribed standard prescription spectacles during 12 months when the children attended school at a distance, said Henry Chan,...

 'Dramatic' Fall in Hospital Admissions for Childhood Infections During Pandemic
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966523

Jan 13th, 2022 - Rates of hospital admissions for common and severe childhood infections in England underwent a "substantial" reduction in the first 12 months of COVID-19, a study found. Cases of influenza, bronchiolitis, and meningitis dipped as pandemic lockdown measures were introduced, bringing school closures, stay-at-home restrictions, and limited travel, as well as shielding measures for those in 'at ris...

Shorter Course of Anticoagulant Therapy Adequate for Provoked VTE in Children
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966398

Jan 12th, 2022 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For children with acute provoked venous thromboembolism (VTE), six weeks of anticoagulant therapy is as effective as a three-month course of anticoagulant therapy, results of a new clinical trial suggest. "When treatment should be stopped is as important as when it should be started," say the authors of an editorial published with the study in JAMA. "The findings sug...

The Etiology of Acute Otitis Media in Young Children in Recent Years
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966498

Jan 12th, 2022 - Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, pediatricians have been seeing fewer cases of all respiratory illnesses, including acute otitis media (AOM). However, as I prepare this column, an uptick has commenced and likely will continue in an upward trajectory as we emerge from the pandemic into an endemic coronavirus era. Our group in Rochester, N.Y., has continued prospective studies of AOM throughout...

Rates of Diagnosis of Neurodevelopmental Disorders Differ by Insurance Type
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966186

Jan 7th, 2022 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Children in the United States with Medicaid insurance are more apt to be diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism or other neurodevelopmental disorders than peers with private insurance. Among more than 3.3 million children, by age 8 years, roughly one in four (23.9%) publicly insured children and one in nine (11.0%) privately insured ch...

Surprising Data on Neurodevelopment of Babies Born During the Pandemic
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/965954

Jan 6th, 2022 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Babies born during the COVID-19 pandemic, irrespective of maternal infection, had slightly lower motor and social skills at age six months compared to babies born before the pandemic, researchers from New York City have found. Yet "to our surprise, we saw absolutely no effect of maternal infection with SARS-CoV-2 on infant neurodevelopment at six months," Dr. Dani Du...

Three Rounds of Antibiotic Therapy Superior to Targeted Treatment for Reducing Yaws Cases
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966116

Jan 6th, 2022 - (Reuters Health) - As a strategy for halting the spread of yaws, mass administration of three rounds of azithromycin at six-month intervals was four times more effective than a single round followed by two rounds of targeted treatment, according to results from more than 56,000 children in Papua New Guinea. The World Health Organization is trying to eradicate the disfiguring skin and long-bones...

Experts Plead for More Pediatric Telehealth 
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/966178

Jan 6th, 2022 - A specialty group is asking federal and state governments to preserve and expand access to telehealth services for children with developmental and behavioral problems. Citing the success during the COVID-19 pandemic of telehealth for these patients, the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (SDBP) has issued a position statement in its official journal calling for continued use of...

ICS Plus LABA Improves Lung Function in School-age Preemie Children
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/965383

Dec 23rd, 2021 - NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Combining inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) with long-acting beta-2-receptor agonists (LABA) improves lung function in school-age children who were born prematurely, according to results of a randomized controlled trial. "Although it has been known for several decades that prematurity is associated with low lung function in childhood and adulthood, the treatment for this...

FDA Approves Secukinumab (Cosentyx) for Pediatric Arthritis
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/965486

Dec 23rd, 2021 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved secukinumab (Cosentyx, Novartis) for the treatment of active enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) in children and adolescents age 4 years and older. The FDA also extended the psoriatic arthritis (PsA) indication of secukinumab to include children and adolescents age 2 years and older, according to a December 22 press release. Secukinumab is t...

The Real Reason Some Newborns Don't Get Screening for Deadly Diseases
https://www.medpagetoday.com/pediatrics/generalpediatrics/96333

Dec 21st, 2021 - Shannon Smith describes her daughter's birth as not all that eventful. She and her husband drove 10 minutes from their home in rural Alabama across the state line to a hospital in Georgia where they had scheduled a C-section for what was anticipated to be a big baby. And she was. Weighing in over 10 lb, Avery was born in April 2019 with what Smith affectionately recalls were "little rolls that ...

Decades-Long Delays in Cluster Headache Diagnosis Common
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/964986

Dec 16th, 2021 - Almost 30% of patients with one of the most painful headache types experience childhood onset of the disorder but are not diagnosed until they are adults, new research suggests. In a survey of more than 1600 participants, 27.5% of patients with cluster headache had pediatric onset. These patients also had a longer mean diagnostic delay than those with adult onset (11.1 years vs 6.2 years, respe...

How LA, Calling the Shots on School Vaccine Mandates, Can Lead the Way on COVID Rules
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/964780

Dec 14th, 2021 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. On March 31, 1977, as a measles epidemic swept through Los Angeles, the county health department issued an ultimatum to the parents of the county’s 1.6 million schoolchildren: Get your kids vaccinated within a month or keep them home. The “no shots, no school” warning was a novel threat at the t...

Half an Hour of Daily Sun Exposure Cuts MS Risk in Half
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/964775

Dec 14th, 2021 - Children, adolescents, and young adults who spend 30 minutes outside in the sun daily may cut their risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) in half, new research suggests. Investigators compared more than 300 children, teens, and young adults with MS aged 3-22 years with more than 500 matched participants without MS. After adjusting for MS risk factors, participants who spent an average of 3...

Dracunculiasis — Guinea Worm Disease — Is Close to Eradication. But Will We Ever Reach the Finish Line?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/964437

Dec 9th, 2021 - When in 1988 former US President Jimmy Carter toured Denchira and Elevanyo, two villages near Accra, Ghana, he noticed a young woman who appeared to be cradling a baby. Carter approached her for a chat, but was stopped in his tracks by a disquieting sight. "It was not a baby. It was her right breast, which was about a foot long, and it had a guinea worm coming out of its nipple," Carter later r...

Prospect of Boosters for Kids Could Depend on Omicron
https://www.medpagetoday.com/pediatrics/vaccines/96081

Dec 8th, 2021 - While a primary series of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine is authorized for kids ages 5 and up, and approved for anyone 16 and older, boosters currently are only authorized in the adult population. Could that change in light of the Omicron variant and if the waning vaccine protection observed in adults occurs in kids as well? In this video, Beth Thielen, MD, PhD, of the University of Minnesota Medica...

Febrile Infants: When Can We Skip the Lumbar Puncture?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/962507

Dec 8th, 2021 - This transcript has been edited for clarity. Christopher J. Chiu, MD: Welcome back to The Cribsiders and our Medscape video recap of our pediatric medicine podcast. Justin, what are we talking about today? Justin L. Berk, MD, MPH, MBA: We're talking about febrile infants and our recent podcast, When Babies Are Too Hot. We talked with Dr Paul Aronson, who joined us to interpret the AAP’s new feb...

Malaria Deaths Rise by 69,000 in 2020 Due to COVID-19 Disruptions, Says WHO
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/964251

Dec 7th, 2021 - (Reuters) - Healthcare disruptions linked to the coronavirus pandemic helped malaria kill 69,000 more people in 2020 than the previous year, but a worst-case scenario was averted, the World Health Organization said on Monday. In total over 627,000 people globally - most of them babies in the poorest parts of Africa - were killed by malaria last year compared with 558,000 in 2019, the WHO said i...