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Pilot study suggests long COVID could be linked to the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the vagus nerve
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/943102

Feb 11th, 2022 - New research to be presented at this year’s European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID 2022, Lisbon, 23-26 April) suggests that many of the symptoms connected to post-COVID syndrome (PCC, also known as long COVID) could be linked to the effect of the virus on the vagus nerve – one of the most important multi-functi...

Long COVID Symptoms Linked to Effects on Vagus Nerve
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/968537

Feb 15th, 2022 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. Several long COVID symptoms could be linked to the effects of the coronavirus on a vital central nerve, according to new research being released this spring. The vagus nerve, which runs from the brain into the body, connects to the h...

Study Suggests Long-lasting Protection from COVID-19 Vaccine
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/954174

Jul 2nd, 2021 - Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. DR. JOHN WHYTE: Welcome, everyone. I'm Dr. John Whyte, chief medical officer, WebMD, and you're watching Coronavirus in Context. Have you been hearing about the boosters? Are we going to need a booster in the fall? I'm not so sure. And to help provide some insights, I've gone to one of the experts, Dr. Rachel ...

Long COVID More Common Than 'Long Flu', Study Suggests
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/959942

Sep 29th, 2021 - People who get flu could have prolonged symptoms which are similar to those seen in some patients with long COVID, a new study suggests. But lasting symptoms occur to a lesser extent among those who have had a bout of flu, academics said. The study examined how many patients experienced long-lasting symptoms after having COVID-19 an...

Levocetirizine and montelukast in the COVID-19 treatment paradigm.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8673734
International Immunopharmacology; May BC, Gallivan KH

Dec 24th, 2021 - Levocetirizine, a third-generation antihistamine, and montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist, exhibit remarkable synergistic anti-inflammatory activity across a spectrum of signaling proteins, cell adhesion molecules, and leukocytes. By targeting cellular protein activity, they are uniquely positioned to treat the symptoms of COVID-19. Clinical data to date with an associa...

Transcutaneous Auricular Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS) can Reverse the Manifestations of the Long-COVID Syndrome: A Pilot Study
https://emrespublisher.com/open-access-pdf/transcutaneous-auricular-vagus-nerve-stimulation-can-reverse-the-manifestations-of-the-long-covid-syndrome-a-pilot-study-100011.pdf
Advances in Neurology and Neuroscience Research; Verbanck P, Clarinval AM et. al.

May 21st, 2021 - Background: SARS-Cov2 has caused unprecedented morbidity, and mortality across the world. Clinically, acute SARS-Cov2 infection ranges from asymptomatic disease to severe pneumonia with respiratory failure, acute kidney and/or cardiac injury. These severe manifestations are induced by hyperinflammation. After the acute phase, a chronic COVID syndrome can occur. Until now, there is no treatme...

Unlocking the Key to COVID-19 and the Brain
https://www.medpagetoday.com/neurology/generalneurology/96803

Jan 21st, 2022 - How can a respiratory pathogen like SARS-CoV-2 cause the nervous system to go haywire? That's a question yet to be answered, observed Serena Spudich, MD, MA, of Yale University, and Avindra Nath, MD, of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, in an essay in Science. "Though COVID-19 is well known as a respiratory disease, neurological symptoms such as confusio...

Antipsychotics Protective Against COVID-19?
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/949354

Apr 15th, 2021 - Editor's note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape's Coronavirus Resource Center. Antipsychotics may protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection or lead to a milder course of illness, new research suggests. "Counterintuitively," the investigators note, vulnerable people with severe mental illness "on antipsychotic treatment showed a lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infe...

Brain Fog After COVID-19 May Last Longer Than We Think
https://www.medpagetoday.com/neurology/generalneurology/95198

Oct 22nd, 2021 - Relatively young people -- ranging from 38 to 59 years old -- showed cognitive dysfunction or "brain fog" months after being diagnosed with COVID-19, a cross-sectional study found. More than 7 months after acute infection, a substantial proportion of COVID-19 patients exhibited deficits in processing speed, executive functioning, category fluency, memory encod...

What Researchers Say About the Long-Term Effects of COVID-19
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960472

Oct 8th, 2021 - NEW YORK (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) this week issued a definition for "long COVID," a term used to describe the persistent health problems that affect some survivors of COVID-19. Scientists are still working to understand the syndrome. Here is what they know so far. HOW DOES THE WHO DEFINE LONG COVID? The WHO defines long ...

Early study suggests long-term antiretroviral therapy with protease inhibitors might prevent COVID-19 infection
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/947587

Mar 25th, 2022 - **Note: the release below is a special early release from the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID 2022, Lisbon, 23-26 April). Please credit the conference if you use this story** Embargo: 2301H UK time Friday 25 March A preliminary study to be presented at this year’s European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Lisbon,...

Different SARS-CoV-2 variants may give rise to different long COVID symptoms, study suggests
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/947495

Mar 24th, 2022 - **Note: the release below is a special early release from the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID 2022, Lisbon, 23-26 April). Please credit the conference if you use this story** Embargo: 2301H UK time Thursday 24 March New research to be presented at this year’s European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Lisbon, Portugal (2...

THE LANCET PUBLIC HEALTH: Study suggests association between severe COVID-19 and long-term mental health outcomes 16 months after an illness
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/946200

Mar 14th, 2022 - Peer-reviewed / Observational study / People A new study published in The Lancet Public Health journal indicates that serious COVID-19 illness is linked to an increase in the risk of long-term adverse mental health effects. The findings suggest that, on the whole, non-hospitalised patients with a SARS-CoV-2 infection were more likely to experience depressive symptoms up to 16 months after dia...

COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy: a midwifery survey into attitudes towards the COVID-19 vacc...
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-13540-y 10.1136/thoraxjnl-2020-215414 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.04.036 10.7326/M20-3569 10.1016/j.urology.2004.10.023 10.1073/pnas.1913405117 10.1111/ppe.12640 10.1037/0003-066X.62.4.271 10.1136/jech-2016-207366 10.1080/13557858.2016.1182126 10.1016/S0140-6736(20)31380-5 10.1093/fampra/cms054 10.1093/pubmed/fds109
BMC Public Health; Odejinmi F, Mallick R et. al.

Jun 19th, 2022 - Ethnically minoritised people have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Emerging evidence suggests a lower uptake of the vaccine in ethnically minoritised people, particularly Black females of reproductive age. Unvaccinated pregnant women are high risk for morbidity and mortality from COVID-19. Midwives are the principal healthcare profes...

UK COVID-19 Update: RCEM Warns of 'COVID Explosion'
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/938904

Oct 9th, 2020 - These are the UK coronavirus stories you need to know about today. REACT Latest Data The continuing REACT study by Ipsos MORI and Imperial College London also produced its latest data today that show 1 in 170 people in England had the virus between 18 September and 5 October with 45,000 new infections a day. Highest infection rates were among 18-24 year olds, 1 in 80 in this group in England wa...

Inhaled corticosteroids for the treatment of COVID-19.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8905579
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; Griesel M, Wagner C et. al.

Mar 10th, 2022 - Inhaled corticosteroids are well established for the long-term treatment of inflammatory respiratory diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. They have been investigated for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The anti-inflammatory action of inhaled corticosteroids might have the potential to reduce the risk of severe illnes...

Implementing lateral flow devices in long-term care facilities: experiences from...
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8544628
BMC Health Services Research; Kierkegaard P, Micocci M et. al.

Oct 27th, 2021 - Antigen-based lateral flow devices (LFDs) offer the potential of widespread rapid testing. The scientific literature has primarily focused on mathematical modelling of their use and test performance characteristics. For these tests to be implemented successfully, an understanding of the real-world contextual factors that allow them to be integrated into the workplace is vital. To address this g...

Even at the Clinic, COVID-19 Could Be in the Air
https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/86707

May 27th, 2020 - Airborne aerosols were generated during speech, sneezing, and during nasal endoscopy procedures in an otolaryngology clinic, reinforcing the importance of universal source control during the COVID-19 epidemic, researchers found. In a simulated clinical setting, speech and nasal endoscopy generated significant airborne aerosols, though simulated sneezing generated the largest numbe...

Mechanism revealed behind loss of smell with COVID-19
https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/942163

Feb 2nd, 2022 - Researchers have discovered a mechanism that may explain why COVID-19 patients lose their sense of smell. Published online February 2 in the journal Cell, the new study found that infection with the pandemic virus, SARS-CoV-2, indirectly dials down the action of olfactory receptors (OR), proteins on the surfaces of nerve cells in the nose that detect the molecules associate...

An immunologist's perspective on anti-COVID-19 vaccines.
https://doi.org/10.1097/ACI.0000000000000788
Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology; Milota T, Strizova Z et. al.

Sep 22nd, 2021 - Antisevere acute respiratory syndrome-corona virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines may provide prompt, effective, and safe solution for the COVID-19 pandemic. Several vaccine candidates have been evaluated in randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Furthermore, data from observational studies mimicking real-life practice and studies on specific groups, such as pregnant women or immunocompromis...